Weekly News Roundup: New Plans and Programs Announced

By Seth Rosenberg

Seth is a current dual MBA/MPA in Sustainable Management student at Presidio Graduate School in San Francisco. He also works as Sourcing Manager for Tomato Sherpa, a new ready-to-cook recipe kit company in the Bay Area.

Jun 27, 2013 | Smart Cities | 1 comment

Washington: President Obama announces Climate Action Plan

On Tuesday at Georgetown University President Barack Obama gave a speech outlining his vision for the country’s response to climate change. In his well-crafted call for action, Obama tactfully dismissed skeptics and the question of whether or not to act at all, asking instead ‘whether we have the courage to act before it’s too late’. He also made sure to address the question of economic growth, asserting that ‘a low-carbon clean energy economy can be an engine of growth for decades to come’. Read the full transcript of his speech here.

The primary components the executive vision are reducing carbon pollution, preparing for the impacts of climate change, and being an international leader in cutting carbon emissions. As part of the strategy to reduce carbon pollution, one of Obama’s main directives was for the EPA to complete new carbon pollution standards for new and existing power plants, which are responsible for 40% of America’s carbon pollution. He also asserted that his plan would help America double its clean energy and set important standards for wasting less energy. If you are curious for the specifics and want an idea about the range of policies in the plan, take a look at the entire Climate Action Plan here.

Across the U.S.: More than 50 elected officials sign campaign for resilience

The Resilient Communities for America Agreement is a call for action for the local leaders of America to help America’s cities, towns, and counties to overcome the challenges of extreme weather caused by climate change, unreliable and costly energy, and economic uncertainty. This agreement, signed by mayors of more than 50 cities, includes commitments to reduce the community’s carbon footprint, to transition to a renewable energy future, to implement energy efficiency programs, and to harness innovations in information technology and green infrastructure.

New York: Bloomberg plans to launch composting program

The New York Times has reported that the administration of Mayor Michael Bloomberg will soon announce that it is hiring a composting plant to handle up to 100,000 tons of food waste a year. Food waste represents the single largest component of municipal solid waste reaching landfills, and is responsible for generating methane- a greenhouse gas much more powerful than carbon dioxide in causing climate change. Working initially on a volunteer basis in homes, schools, and high-rises, the program is expected to become mandatory and expand to the entire city by 2015 or 2016. Ron Gonen, Deputy Sanitation Commissioner for Recycling and Sustainability, was quoted to say that diverting food waste and other organic materials could save the city about $100 million a year.

Shenzhen, China: China’s first carbon market

In the first of 7 city-based carbon trading pilot projects, Shenzhen established a platform allowing businesses to trade permits to emit carbon. Companies are assigned emissions quotas and can sell excess permits to other firms if they emit below their quota. Trading began last week. The plan to open similar projects in other areas of China by the end of this year includes the nation’s capital Beijing, major commercial center Shanghai, and the port city of Tianjin. Although the project won’t necessarily produce significant emissions reductions and China has no overall targets to reduce absolute carbon emissions, some believe this could be a step to a nationwide carbon market.

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1 Comment

  1. I am delighted to hear about both Obama and Bloomberg taking climate action. I am a former NYC resident and have been talking about NYC’s lack of composting and food recycling for years. It seems to be an incredible low-hanging fruit and an easy fix for improving the quality of life in the city. So many apartments have bug and rat problems because their food waste mixes with the garbage in the buildings and on the streets. Our apartment building had a garbage shoot that was covered in food waste from garbage bags opening or breaking. Moreover, during major rain or snow storms, the streets are covered in food waste from opened garbage bags. I think a food recycling program in NYC will not only save money and directly impact climate change, but it will also vastly improve the livability and cleanliness of the city in a positive way. It will require a major behavior change on the part of New Yorkers though. NYC should look at what SF has done with their food recycling program and take note. It’s been immensely successful in SF due to smart policies and behavior incentives.

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