The Meeting of the Minds Peer-to-Peer Publishing

The Meeting of the Minds website is a place to continue the discussion and momentum of Meeting of the Minds events with an expanded and knowledgeable online audience.

 

Authors are selected much like our event speakers are selected – we look for innovative leaders who are working on urban projects that spotlight the main themes of Meeting of the Minds: technology, environment, economy, governance, society, resources, infrastructure, mobility and the important interplay between all of them.

Recent Articles

How Gen Z Impacts Urban Mobility

How Gen Z Impacts Urban Mobility

New mobility culture calls into question the commute and opens new options for city planning and commute patterns. Our study found almost two-thirds of Gen Z consumers would be willing to accept a longer commute in a self-driving vehicle. While the single driver commuter experience is generally perceived as bad, unhealthy, and stressful, the “we” commute of mobility culture could be a positive and healthy experience similar to today’s train commutes.

MetroLab’s 10 Principles for Government + University Partnerships

MetroLab’s 10 Principles for Government + University Partnerships

Using tools like algorithms and sensors, smart cities increase the quality of life for their residents, by making these communities cleaner, safer and healthier. When done thoughtfully smart cities efforts can also strive to make cities more inclusive and equitable. At the end of the day, it’s all about the people who live in these communities and making their interactions with city and/or county services easier and better.

California as an Example for Managing Urban Water in Drought Periods

California as an Example for Managing Urban Water in Drought Periods

Coordinated approaches are preferred for building urban drought resilience. Over the long term, a “trust but verify” policy can be more effective than the “better safe than sorry” approach of the mandate because the former encourages local suppliers to continue investing in diversified supplies. A good model is the stress-test approach the state adopted toward the end of the drought, which allowed local utilities to drop mandated conservation if they could demonstrate that they had drought-resilient supplies to last three more years.
In the wake of the drought, the state has adopted measures to improve information sharing, including a system for urban suppliers to provide regular updates on their supply situations. To encourage all agencies to prepare for more extreme droughts, urban water management planning documents must now address how suppliers would manage longer droughts.

Why Write for Meeting of the Minds?

Our publishing platform is exclusively written by busy professionals working in a fast-paced industry. We know that you have a lot on your calendar, and that committing to write for Meeting of the Minds is a big ask.

So why should you spend time on this?

Reach Influential Decision Makers

Our audience is a lot like you — working professionals interested in wonky, detailed descriptions of ideas and projects happening in the urban sustainability and smart cities industry. They are executive and senior level leaders interested in staying up-to-date with the newest innovations in the industry, and looking for the “big picture.”

In fact, a recent survey of our website audience showed that 80% of our readers are either executive level, senior level, or CEOs at their organizations. And the majority of them – 41% – stated that their preferred method of engagement with Meeting of the Minds was reading articles online. You can see more results of that survey at this link.

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Third-party Validation

Meeting of the Minds is an independent, non-profit knowledge-sharing platform partnered with trailblazing organizations in the public, private, academic, non-profit and philanthropic sectors. Our mission is to connect people and ideas working at the leading edge of urban sustainability, in order to catalyze positive change in cities worldwide.

There is a community of people looking to us to find and spotlight the trends and innovations happening in this space, and our website is your opportunity to present your thoughts to this community — backed by the validation of our platform.

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Editorial Assistance

When you sit down to write for Meeting of the Minds, the question you should be asking yourself is this: “What knowledge do I possess that can help advance the social, economic, and environmental sustainability of cities? What do I know that others don’t?”

The progress of environmental sustainability in cities is accelerated by the flow of information between people. And when you want to communicate this information to our audience, you are not alone. We have dedicated staff – especially our Managing Editor, Hannah Greinetz – to help you craft your message. From basic things, like fixing typos, to larger issues of tone and substance, we are here to help.

Promotion

Your article will be emailed to the 30,000+ people on our email list. It will be deployed on all of our social media channels, and re-deployed on our social media feeds at regular intervals for the next two years. Your article will be archived on all of the major search engines, and may even rank on the first page of search queries related to your topic.

We’ll take care of all of this promotion for you, and you’ll never have to manage it. (That said — if you are able to help us with promotion by sharing it on your own social media feeds and in our own newsletters, your articles are likely to receive even more views.)

Writing guidelines for Meeting of the Minds Publishing

“The Six Rules”

  1. Submissions must be greater than 800 words, but less than 2,000.
  2. Absolutely no advertising copy or press-releases.
  3. Articles should be exclusive to MeetingoftheMinds.org and not previously published online.
  1. Articles should be written in a non-academic, conversational tone.
  2. Include, whenever possible, bullet-point lists, short paragraphs, and the judicious use of bold and italics.
  3. Imagesvideos and hyperlinks are encouraged.

Please also include a short, one (1) sentence biography with your article. Your bio will be published with your article.

Additional tips

The Meeting of the Minds audience is a smart and busy group of people. In order to get their attention the content you write has to be readable, valuable, and compelling.

What’s the best way to grab the attention of our audience? Here are some general tips.

Write a good headline

This is something our editing team will help you with, but you should think about it, too. We share our content through social media, newsletters, RSS feeds, and any other way we can. Most of the people that we’re able to reach in this way only see the headline, then click to read more. That means we need to come up with a very compelling headline.

Note: please keep headlines to 60 characters or less.

Give away secrets

Not proprietary information, of course, but you have to give the audience something of value. They are giving you their time, and they hope to be rewarded with information they haven’t heard before and can’t get anywhere else. So tell them a secret. Give them an insight that only you know. Break a paradigm. Challenge their thinking.

Write for screens, not for paper

Studies have shown that people’s reading habits are different when they read from a screen than when they read from a piece of paper. We can expect that no one will print out your article to read it, so we can expect that your audience will see your content on a screen. You should, then, tailor your writing to what works best on a screen.

There was a great article in Slate magazine years ago that explains this in more detail, but here is the gist of it:

  • Write smaller paragraphs – on a screen, even 1 sentence can be a paragraph. Eye-tracking tests show that most people skip over large blocks of text when reading on screens.
  • Use bullet-point lists – we’re doing it right now. Doesn’t this make it easier to read?
  • Use bold, links and italics to emphasize content – of course you don’t want people to skim your article…but they inevitably will. Help them find the important parts by emphasizing them with formatting and links.
  • Break your article up with explanatory subheaders – Sectionalize your article with subheaders that explain what each section is about.
  • Write less – as we said above, you should keep your articles over 600 words, but under 2,000. Studies show that readers start to get restless after 1,000 words or so.

That will get your started. Remember that you’re not on your own with this, our editing team will help you shape your article to fit our audience and our guidelines. We’ll work together to make sure your voice is heard in the Meeting of the Minds community.

Reposting your article

The copyright and ownership of your article remains with you when you publish on MeetingoftheMinds.org. That means that you are welcome to repost your article on your website or other websites. However, we ask that you wait 7 days before reposting, and include the following text at the top of the article:

This article originally appeared on MeetingoftheMinds.org.

Interested? Contact us.

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