SeeClickFix Teams With Huffington Post, Citizens To Assess Storm Damage

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Oct 30, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

SeeClickFix has teamed up with regional and national media outlets to help assess the damage from Hurricane Sandy.

Websites like the Huffington Post and the Bangor Daily News are using the innovative, interactive mapping tools powered by SeeClickFix to report and track storm damage throughout the eastern seaboard.

From the SeeClickFix blog:

“SeeClickFix has proven to be an essential tool for media to leverage in the face of emergency events such as Sandy,” said Ben Berkowitz, CEO of SeeClickFix. “Having access to realtime information from others in communities affected by the storm is critical for both the safety of citizens, as well as for the post-storm cleanup efforts that will be taking place once the hurricane passes.”

SeeClickFix map widgets for media can be used for free and can be customized to display issues specific to a geographic area. More so, the maps can be configured to display only realtime information about storm damage. Reports about storm damage can be submitted through these widgets on media websites and mobile websites, as well as through SeeClickFix’s website and mobile apps.

Embed your own SeeClickFix map using the widget generator at SeeClickFix.com.

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