Meeting of the Minds Announces Two New Board Members

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Nov 15, 2016 | Announcements | 0 comments

Meeting of the Minds is proud to announce two new Board Members: Scott Mauvais and John Jefferson.

Both have been long-time allies and supporters of Meeting of the Minds. They have repeatedly brought their expertise in urban and technology issues to our wider global thought leadership network through participation in our events, annual summit, brainstorming workshops, webinars, blog, and more.

John Jefferson is the Director of Statewide Constituency Relations at AT&T. He is responsible for the development and execution of strategy for coalition building and relationship management statewide. His focus is on building strong ties to influencers in segments ranging from rural and agriculture, to public safety and the environment as well as partnering with government, consumer, and business sales colleagues to create effortless customer service and accelerate sales opportunities.

Scott Mauvais is the Director of Technology and Civic Innovation at Microsoft’s San Francisco offices where he works with government and civic leaders, and the citizens they serve, to tackle urban challenges.

We greatly look forward to working with them further to strengthen the organization and identify new opportunities to deepen our impact.

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