Meeting of the Minds 2014 Final Report & Infographic

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Oct 27, 2014 | Announcements | 1 comment

The Meeting of the Minds 2014 Final Report is now available. Download your PDF copy here:

Download Final Report

The final report includes statistics from the event and lead-up activities, a synopsis of the Detroit sessions with links to videos and slidedecks, media coverage, photos, and a full delegate list.

We’ve also created the below infographic for a quick summary.

Meeting-of-the-Minds-2014-Infographic

Discussion

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1 Comment

  1. Hi Jessie:
    Thanks for sending me the invite for the webinar on Nov.11 to which I have responded.
    I have recently conducted research vis-a-vis a literature review on optimization of transportation capacity utilization specific to the problem of empty travel of trucks, under the auspices of Wilfrid Laurier University (Dr. Michael Haughton’s team). My findings thus far have lead me to the growing concern of congestion and the huge imbalance in commodity flow in/out of urban areas–a condition that is expected to continue to balloon with the anticipated growth in the urban populations.
    Many logistics and transportation providers are looking for solutions that require the collaboration and cooperation of municipalities, private corporations and industry as it relates to consolidation centres, co-loading of shipments, and freight matching in order to minimize GHG emissions, fuel consumption and associated costs–all of which are necessary for sustainable cities.
    My question to you is whether or not you (Meeting of the Minds and partners) have any experts looking at this area of concern since efficient transportation is vital to every aspect of life? Is it part of the new ISO evaluation?

    Thank you.
    Shelley-Ann Solomon
    647-680-2918
    P.S. I apologize for any errors made as I thought the email was from Gordon.

    Reply

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