$100k in Funding Available for Mobility Solutions

By James Courtney

James Courtney is the Digital Lead for the City of Tomorrow Challenge.

Ford has teamed up with AT&T, Dell Technologies and Microsoft to launch the City of Tomorrow Challenge, a space for residents, businesses and community groups to connect and collaborate on solutions that improve mobility in cities. For more information about 2018 challenges hosted by Pittsburgh, Miami-Dade County, and Grand Rapids, visit challenges.cityoftomorrow.com, email us at COTC@ford.com, or socialize with us on Twitter.

Sep 20, 2018 | Announcements, Mobility | 0 comments

The City of Tomorrow Challenge is focused on Re-Imagining Mobility for People

Ideas are great. Technology is great. But if those new ideas manifest as products and services that don’t serve a need, then why make them? This is a question our City of Tomorrow Challenge team thinks about daily as we partner with Pittsburgh, Miami-Dade, and Grand Rapids to host innovation challenges that place residents at the center of mobility design and crowdsource new solutions that address their needs and local context.

Each City Challenge provides a unique opportunity to learn about local mobility issues, connect with influencers and innovators, and win up to $100,000 to pilot your mobility solution.

The application deadlines for our three 2018 challenge cities are:

  • Miami-Dade: September 17
  • Grand Rapids: October 1
  • Pittsburgh: October 10

This question came to life for me at one of our recent community working sessions where I met Jonah, a college student who leads a number of student organizations and is an advocate for at-risk populations especially those with physical disabilities. For Jonah, who has a physical disability himself, meeting people is both the hardest and most important thing he does. The inability to make an appointment because of lack of infrastructure to transport him or attend community meetings due to rigidity in on-demand transit scheduling is a barrier to him living out his passion for helping people.

How can new mobility technology, data and design help Jonah? How can it help the many others we’ve talked to – such as Sarah, a researcher in Pittsburgh, and Daren a returning citizen? These are the questions we’ve posed to our challenge community, focused on three key opportunity areas:

  • Enabling smarter (or simpler) transportation choices
  • Extending mobility options
  • Encouraging walking, biking and busing

Over the last three months, the City of Tomorrow Challenge Team has been working to learn those experiences and pain points. We are using an approach that is rooted in insight and is developed by focusing on everyday people’s mobility experiences. Creating a baseline understanding of the environment we aspire to serve through existing data sources like transit ridership, income, age and other demographics. To add context to those data points, ethnographic interviews with transit riders help explain some of the insights and trends in the data. Riding with them on the bus or train and listening to them in their homes gives an intimate view into deficiencies that the systems we all rely on have.

 

 

Using Analytics and Research to Understand a Narrative

At every step of the process we are thinking, learning and designing with and not just for the end user.

I don't want to rely on my boyfriend for rides to my doctor's appointments… if I'm just physically worn-out and I can't, then I'll call him

-Amy

For example, the Challenge team interviewed a number of people in their homes. Some of the stories really illustrate how people’s daily lives can be affected so significantly by their lack of access to resilient transit. For example, in Pittsburgh, a transit rider named Amy was at the mercy of the public system. She doesn’t own a car and also does not have a credit card so ride hailing was not something she could do. Walking was also problematic has she has limited mobility/ health issues and lives in a very hilly area of Pittsburgh. She spoke of the anxiety she has when she would go out as she was always unsure of what the day had in store for her, including if the she could make it up the hill near her house to the bus.

 

Community working session in Grand Rapids, MI

 

During community working sessions in Grand Rapids we discovered that invisible barriers cause people mobility stressors and sometimes they cope in ways that is invisible to the outside. Disabilities can be defined in many ways. Lowering the stress of using mobility can help people focus on their personal needs not just how they’re getting around. Derek spoke to this as his wheelchair made trips take significantly longer that they would without. The fact that the system didn’t always support door to door service creates a new stressor for him as now he would need to leave over an hour early to get somewhere on time.

There are people that amaze me with how they get around. Unable to use legs, arms, use a mouth stick. People that are blind and going to work. Disabilities have so many different faces and it’s so subjective, what exactly that is. - Derek

Our application period is open and these opportunity areas are manifesting in ideas submitted by residents, businesses, and community organizations that can impact cities and residents within them who need a shift in the current state of mobility. In the next phase of the challenge, we will select 10-12 semi-finalists per city and work with them to refine their solutions into potential pilot projects before selecting the final team(s) to win up to $100k to bring their idea to life.

 


 

The City of Tomorrow Challenge is made possible through the support and coordination of these organizations.

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