Meeting of the Minds Blog Magazine, Vol. 1

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Communications for Meeting of the Minds. He leads the organization's online and offline communications strategy.

Jul 8, 2013 | Announcements | 0 comments

We’re releasing a new tool this week that will help you get ready for Meeting of the Minds 2013 in Toronto.

Our blog here at CityMinded.org has grown incredibly in the last 6 months—hosting discussions from foundations, private sector leaders, independent thought leaders and event government agencies like USAID, HUD and the State Department.

New Formats

As I talk with our bloggers and partners and others, though, I know that some of you would like to have more format options for our blog posts. “Can you send it to me in a PDF?” is a common request.

The answer is yes! At the end of each of our blog posts there is a link that says, “Click here to download a printable, PDF version of this article.” Clicking the link will automatically provide you with a printable, PDF version.

But what about other formats? We recently began releasing podcasts. We have monthly webinars. Of course we have our video (with transcripts) of previous Meeting of the Minds talks. We have photos from past events. For face-to-face time we organize monthly meetups in San Francisco and elsewhere.

Brand new this week, we’re releasing a PDF magazine that you can print or read on your mobile device (it looks great on an iPad). I gathered some of my favorite blog posts and created a 30-page PDF magazine that you can download and take with you. The magazine will give you a good idea of the kind of discussions that we have at Meeting of the Minds, as well as the kind of people that make up our community.

Click here to download Volume 1.

Volume 1

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In Volume 1 we hear from thought leaders in the following topics:

  • Government & entrepreneurship
  • Transportation
  • The future of work
  • City infrastructure
  • The internet of things
  • Social equity
  • Energy
  • Environment

The magazine includes articles from Meeting of the Minds delegates and speakers like Julie Lein and Charles Rutheiser. It’s a great way to get ready for our Meeting this September.

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Read more from the CityMinded.org Blog

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

Big Data, Automation, and the Future of Transportation

In recent years, a variety of forces (economic, environmental, and social) have quickly given rise to “shared mobility,” a collective of entrepreneurs and consumers leveraging technology to share transportation resources, save money, and generate capital. Bikesharing services, such as BCycle, and business-to-consumer carsharing services, such as Zipcar, have become part of a sociodemographic trend that has pushed shared mobility from the fringe to the mainstream. The role of shared mobility in the broader landscape of urban mobility has become a frequent topic of discussion. Shared transportation modes—such as bikesharing, carsharing, ridesharing, ridesourcing/transportation network companies (TNCs), and microtransit—are changing how people travel and are having a transformative effect on smart cities.

Smart Cities and the Weather

A study by the US National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in 2008 found that the impact of routine weather events on the US economy equates annually to about 3.4% of the country’s GDP (about $485 billion). This excludes the impact of extreme weather events that cause damage and disruption – after all, even “ordinary” weather affects supply of and demand for many items, and the propensity of businesses and consumers to buy them. NCAR found that mining and agriculture are particularly sensitive to weather influences, with utilities and retail not far behind.

Many of these, disaster management included, are the focus of smart city innovations. Not surprisingly, therefore, as they seek to improve and optimize these systems, smart cities are beginning to understand the connection between weather and many of their goals.  A number of vendors (for example, IBM, Schneider Electric, and others) now offer weather data-driven services focused specifically on smart city interests.

Meeting of the Minds is made possible by the generous support of these organizations.