Meeting of the Minds Blog Magazine, Vol. 1

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Jul 8, 2013 | Announcements | 0 comments

We’re releasing a new tool this week that will help you get ready for Meeting of the Minds 2013 in Toronto.

Our blog here at CityMinded.org has grown incredibly in the last 6 months—hosting discussions from foundations, private sector leaders, independent thought leaders and event government agencies like USAID, HUD and the State Department.

New Formats

As I talk with our bloggers and partners and others, though, I know that some of you would like to have more format options for our blog posts. “Can you send it to me in a PDF?” is a common request.

The answer is yes! At the end of each of our blog posts there is a link that says, “Click here to download a printable, PDF version of this article.” Clicking the link will automatically provide you with a printable, PDF version.

But what about other formats? We recently began releasing podcasts. We have monthly webinars. Of course we have our video (with transcripts) of previous Meeting of the Minds talks. We have photos from past events. For face-to-face time we organize monthly meetups in San Francisco and elsewhere.

Brand new this week, we’re releasing a PDF magazine that you can print or read on your mobile device (it looks great on an iPad). I gathered some of my favorite blog posts and created a 30-page PDF magazine that you can download and take with you. The magazine will give you a good idea of the kind of discussions that we have at Meeting of the Minds, as well as the kind of people that make up our community.

Click here to download Volume 1.

Volume 1

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In Volume 1 we hear from thought leaders in the following topics:

  • Government & entrepreneurship
  • Transportation
  • The future of work
  • City infrastructure
  • The internet of things
  • Social equity
  • Energy
  • Environment

The magazine includes articles from Meeting of the Minds delegates and speakers like Julie Lein and Charles Rutheiser. It’s a great way to get ready for our Meeting this September.

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