Toyota Features Scion iQ-EV at Meeting of the Minds 2012

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Oct 18, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

The Scion iQ-EV, the smallest 4-passenger, 100% electric vehicle in the world, is designed to charge in 3 hours and cover a range of 62 miles. The car is considered the next frontier of urban mobility solutions, allowing drivers to park in miniscule spaces that were previously unavailable to them, as well as lower their carbon footprint in the process.

The Scion iQ-EV is not yet on the market but Toyota displayed the car for the first time to Meeting of the Minds attendees to gather their opinions. Only 100 iQ-EVs are available in the U.S., and we were happy to have Toyota display this one at Meeting of the Minds in San Francisco.

For an in depth analysis of the Scion iQ-EV, don't miss the full review of the Scion iQ-EV by John Addison of CleanFleetReport.com.

Toyota also displayed the Th!nk, an older small electric vehicle to serve as a comparison with the iQ-EV. Spec sheets for both vehicles are available here: Scion spec sheet, Th!nk spec sheet.

[galleria transition="fade" speed="6500" height="405" width="588"]
[image title="Scion iQ-EV" alt="Scion iQ-EV"]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083756556_44ff055c0e_z.jpeg[/image]
[image title="Scion iQ-EV" alt="Scion iQ-EV"]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083756142_2ac412b96b_z.jpeg[/image]
[image title="Scion iQ-EV" alt="Scion iQ-EV"]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083747755_4057944308_z.jpeg[/image]
[image title="Th!nk EV" alt="Th!nk EV"]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083766683_725a571098_b.jpeg[/image]
[image title="Th!nk EV" alt="Th!nk EV"]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083760419_7abb13979d_z.jpeg[/image]
[image title="Th!nk EV" alt="Th!nk EV"]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083742752_6d784f9c01_b.jpeg[/image]
[/galleria]

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Read more from the Meeting of the Minds Blog

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

Creating a Smart Lake Erie

In recent years, Lake Erie had one of the greatest threats to its urban water supply: harmful algal blooms. This deep green gunk is a result of phosphorus-rich fertilizer runoff from farm fields. The runoff made Toledo, Ohio’s freshwater undrinkable for several days...

Lessons Learned from Age-Friendly Columbus and Franklin County

In Columbus, Ohio, we dedicated ourselves to planning with, not for, our older adults. For us, that meant committees made up of content experts (professionals working in transit, housing, development, aging, and elected officials) and experience experts (older adults and individuals with disabilities) totaling over 125 volunteers that lead our work. Our initiative started at the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission, outside of the typical “aging world” in order to challenge cross-sector leaders to work with an “age-in-everything lens.” In 2016, we completed our assessment through a city-wide random sample survey, focus groups held in six languages, and tabling at various events. In total, we heard from nearly 1,200 older adults over the course of six months.

How & Why to Create a Culture of Innovation in Transportation Agencies

Though there are many critical factors in creating and sustaining a culture of innovation, leadership has emerged as perhaps the most critical. A change of administration or staff turnover is one of the most common reasons for why these initiatives end. Therefore, it is important to take the politics out of innovation by ensuring that champions are not all political appointees or nearing retirement.

Share This