Toyota Features Scion iQ-EV at Meeting of the Minds 2012

By Jessie Feller Hahn, Executive Director, Meeting of the Minds

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds where she is responsible for identifying global urban sustainability, innovation, technology best practices and thought leadership, developing platforms for city leaders to share lessons learned, and building alliances and partnerships across and within sectors.

Oct 18, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments


Who will you meet?

Cities are innovating, companies are pivoting, and start-ups are growing. Like you, every urban practitioner has a remarkable story of insight and challenge from the past year.

Meet these peers and discuss the future of cities in the new Meeting of the Minds Executive Cohort Program. Replace boring virtual summits with facilitated, online, small-group discussions where you can make real connections with extraordinary, like-minded people.


 

The Scion iQ-EV, the smallest 4-passenger, 100% electric vehicle in the world, is designed to charge in 3 hours and cover a range of 62 miles. The car is considered the next frontier of urban mobility solutions, allowing drivers to park in miniscule spaces that were previously unavailable to them, as well as lower their carbon footprint in the process.

The Scion iQ-EV is not yet on the market but Toyota displayed the car for the first time to Meeting of the Minds attendees to gather their opinions. Only 100 iQ-EVs are available in the U.S., and we were happy to have Toyota display this one at Meeting of the Minds in San Francisco.

For an in depth analysis of the Scion iQ-EV, don’t miss the full review of the Scion iQ-EV by John Addison of CleanFleetReport.com.

Toyota also displayed the Th!nk, an older small electric vehicle to serve as a comparison with the iQ-EV. Spec sheets for both vehicles are available here: Scion spec sheet, Th!nk spec sheet.

[galleria transition=”fade” speed=”6500″ height=”405″ width=”588″]
[image title=”Scion iQ-EV” alt=”Scion iQ-EV”]https://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083756556_44ff055c0e_z.jpeg[/image]
[image title=”Scion iQ-EV” alt=”Scion iQ-EV”]https://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083756142_2ac412b96b_z.jpeg[/image]
[image title=”Scion iQ-EV” alt=”Scion iQ-EV”]https://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083747755_4057944308_z.jpeg[/image]
[image title=”Th!nk EV” alt=”Th!nk EV”]https://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083766683_725a571098_b.jpeg[/image]
[image title=”Th!nk EV” alt=”Th!nk EV”]https://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083760419_7abb13979d_z.jpeg[/image]
[image title=”Th!nk EV” alt=”Th!nk EV”]https://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083742752_6d784f9c01_b.jpeg[/image]
[/galleria]

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read more from MeetingoftheMinds.org

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

Sustainability and Resilience: Not Quite the Perfect Relationship

Sustainability and Resilience: Not Quite the Perfect Relationship

People seem frequently to assume that the terms “sustainability” and “resilience” are synonyms, an impression reinforced by the frequent use of the term “climate resilience”, which seems to enmesh both concepts firmly.  In fact, while they frequently overlap, and indeed with good policy and planning reinforce one another, they are not the same.  This article picks them apart to understand where one ends and the other begins, and where the “sweet spot” lies in achieving mutual reinforcement to the benefit of disaster risk reduction (DRR).

Stormwater Management is an Equity Issue

Stormwater Management is an Equity Issue

As extreme weather conditions become the new normal—from floods in Baton Rouge and Venice to wildfires in California, we need to clean and save stormwater for future use while protecting communities from flooding and exposure to contaminated water. Changing how we manage stormwater has the potential to preserve access to water for future generations; prevent unnecessary illnesses, injuries, and damage to communities; and increase investments in green, climate-resilient infrastructure, with a focus on communities where these kinds of investments are most needed.

Public-Private Collaboration – Essential for Disaster Risk Reduction

Public-Private Collaboration – Essential for Disaster Risk Reduction

A few years ago, I worked with some ARISE-US members to carry out a survey of small businesses in post-Katrina New Orleans of disaster risk reduction (DRR) awareness.  One theme stood out to me more than any other.  The businesses that had lived through Katrina and survived well understood the need to be prepared and to have continuity plans.  Those that were new since Katrina all tended to have the view that, to paraphrase, “well, government (city, state, federal…) will take care of things”.

While the experience after Katrina, of all disasters, should be enough to show anyone in the US that there are limits on what government can do, it does raise the question, of what could and should public and private sectors expect of one another?

The Future of Cities

Mayors, planners, futurists, technologists, executives and advocates — hundreds of urban thought leaders publish on Meeting of the Minds. Sign up to follow the future of cities.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Wait! Before You Leave —

Wait! Before You Leave —

Subscribe to receive updates on the Executive Cohort Program!

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Share This