Ontario’s Minister Duguid Announces Toronto 2013

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Nov 14, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

At Meeting of the Minds in San Francisco this year we were grateful to have Brad Duguid, the Minister of Economic Development and Innovation for Ontario, Canada with us via Cisco’s TelePresence Technology to announce Toronto as the host city for Meeting of the Minds 2013.

Watch the video above to hear his remarks about the event, which are also transcribed below.

Transcript

Allow me to officially welcome all of you in advance to Toronto, Ontario for the Meeting of the Minds 2013. You’re going to be coming to a city and a province that’s now become a global hotbed for research and innovation. In fact, the Greater Toronto Area is now considered in the top four communities in the world in terms of business start-ups.

I want to welcome each and every one of you in advance to Toronto. I gotta tell you, with global innovation leaders like Cisco and Toyota this Meeting of the Minds 2013 is going to be absolutely spectacular. So I expect to see each and every one of you tuning in today and participating in the conference this year to be in Toronto for 2013.

Thank you all so much.

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