SmartPlanet Coverage of Meeting of the Minds 2012

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Oct 17, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

SmartPlanet's Rachel King continued her excellent coverage of Meeting of the Minds 2012 this week with two articles focused on Colin Harrison and Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson.

Excerpts:

‘Smart’ cities organize services around needs

The digital and physical worlds are converging, enabling us to leverage information to develop new insights and wisdom, according to IBM engineer Dr. Colin Harrison.

Speaking at Meeting of the Minds 2012 on Wednesday morning, Harrison covered the basic set of principles behind IBM’s Intelligent Operations Center and portfolio of solutions designed to enable smarter cities and intelligent systems for public safety, utilities, transportation, social programs and venues.

In explaining the genesis behind the Smarter Planet initiative at IBM, Harrison cited that the world has produced the following during the last 20 years:

  • A global, high-bandwidth network
  • A population of over 1 billion Internet users
  • Roughly 4 billion mobile phones
  • Billions of embedded sensors in infrastructures and environment
  • Globally-integrated business processes

Harrison posited that it is no longer necessary to make guesses about what is happening today or what might happen tomorrow because we have the data and the planet is wired for that data.

Read the full article

Vancouver mayor: Cities are ‘most entrepreneurial level of government’

Vancouver mayor Gregor Robertson asserts that his city’s economy will be the fastest growing of any city in Canada, adding that defies the myth that you can’t be green and prosperous at the same time.

“Our goal is to be a mecca for green enterprise. We’re not alone in that,” asserted Robertson, while speaking at Meeting of the Minds 2012 on Wednesday afternoon, adding that the British Columbia city has “an enormous amount of expertise” to offer.

For example, Robertson cited that Vancouver has a hydroelectric power infrastructure, making 90 percent of electricity produced green and renewable.

Robertson described that Vancouver, the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada, is constrained by land between the North Shore Mountains, the Pacific Ocean and the U.S.-Canadian border. Thus, as the city grows exponentially, that requires some creative thinking about how to sustain that growth without wasting and running out of resources.

“Cities are all about action. We are the most entrepreneurial level of government,” Robertson remarked.

Read the full article

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