Smart Cities

What’s a ‘smart’ city? There’s no one definition. For many city leaders — and especially the private sector —  the term has become a shorthand for technology that makes cities work better or more efficiently.

 

Scroll down to see all of Meeting of the Minds blog posts, talks, and upcoming events related to smart and sustainable cities.

Recent Events Related to Smart Cities

Webinar: Innovating and Managing Transit in the Era of New Mobility

On November 14, 2018, Meeting of the Minds hosted a free, live webinar featuring AJ O’Connor of TriMet and Adrian Pearmine of DKS Associates. We discussed the emergence of new mobility technologies, partnerships and opportunities in the transportation sector.

Webinar: Sacramento’s Urban Innovation Agenda

The City of Sacramento recently announced a $100M partnership with Verizon making Sacramento the first city in the country with commercially available 5G. The move will provide robust broadband infrastructure for a host of new smart city technologies and strategies to be deployed.

Recent Blog Posts Related to Smart Cities

COVID-19 is Creating the Largest Ever Telecommunity, But Not for Everyone

COVID-19 is Creating the Largest Ever Telecommunity, But Not for Everyone

Social distancing is becoming the new normal, at least for those of us who are heeding the Center for Disease Control’s warnings and guidelines. But if you don’t have reliable, high-speed broadband, it is impossible to engage in what is now the world’s largest telecommunity. As many schools and universities around the world (including those of my kids) are shut down, these institutions are optimistically converting to online and digital learning. However, with our current broadband layout, this movement will certainly leave many Americans behind.

How to Prepare our Cities For Autonomous Vehicles

How to Prepare our Cities For Autonomous Vehicles

Shared mobility services have been proposed as a solution to urban congestion. When Uber and Lyft launched a decade ago, proponents of this model of peer-to-peer “ride sharing” claimed it would revolutionize public transportation to the point of replacing it. Opponents of a 2016 ballot measure to fund transit projects in Detroit wrote, “The proposal spends billions on old transit tech like buses and rail while other cities are contracting out transit services to Uber, Lyft, Chariot and others that provide door-to-door service at substantial savings.”

In the meantime, we’ve learned that peer-to-peer ride sharing services, better called ride-hailing services since they primarily function as taxis carrying individual passengers, have made traffic 180 percent worse in some cities. They have over-supplied the market with vehicles that are empty most of the time, on average adding 2.8 miles of traffic for every mile they carry passengers.

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