Smart Cities

What’s a ‘smart’ city? There’s no one definition. For many city leaders — and especially the private sector —  the term has become a shorthand for technology that makes cities work better or more efficiently.

 

Scroll down to see all of Meeting of the Minds blog posts, talks, and upcoming events related to smart and sustainable cities.

Recent Events Related to Smart Cities

Webinar: Innovating and Managing Transit in the Era of New Mobility

On November 14, 2018, Meeting of the Minds hosted a free, live webinar featuring AJ O’Connor of TriMet and Adrian Pearmine of DKS Associates. We discussed the emergence of new mobility technologies, partnerships and opportunities in the transportation sector.

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Webinar: Sacramento’s Urban Innovation Agenda

The City of Sacramento recently announced a $100M partnership with Verizon making Sacramento the first city in the country with commercially available 5G. The move will provide robust broadband infrastructure for a host of new smart city technologies and strategies to be deployed.

Recent Blog Posts Related to Smart Cities

Encouraging Civic Engagement with What Matters Most to Residents

Encouraging Civic Engagement with What Matters Most to Residents

OurStreets origins are rooted in capturing latent sentiment on social media and converting it to standardized data. It all started in July 2018, when OurStreets co-founder, Daniel Schep, was inspired by the #bikeDC community tweeting photos of cars blocking bike lanes, and built the @HowsMyDrivingDC Twitter bot. The bot used license plate info to produce a screenshot of the vehicle’s outstanding citations from the DC DMV website.

Fast forward to March 2020, and D.C. Department of Public Works asking if we could repurpose OurStreets to crowdsource the availability of essential supplies during the COVID-19 crisis. Knowing how quickly we needed to move in order to be effective, we set out to make a new OurStreets functionality viable nationwide.

One Approach for Cities to Recoup Lost Revenues Due to COVID-19

One Approach for Cities to Recoup Lost Revenues Due to COVID-19

We encourage public sector partners to think about data monetization as a spectrum of opportunities. On one end, there’s indirect monetization, which refers to the obvious idea of getting more value from data by doing more with what already exists. That could mean putting data in a more accessible form or location; sharing it across departments more effectively; or mining it more deeply to identify potential operational insights, anomalies, or efficiencies.

On the other end of the spectrum is the idea of direct monetization, meaning new, incremental revenue flowing directly to the city in exchange for the rental, purchase, or limited use of the city’s data. This is approach requires some focus and a proactive sales effort, but can deliver attractive, meaningful revenue streams.

In the middle of the spectrum is what we think of as the Hybrid opportunity. This is often where cities are most comfortable getting started, since its initial focus is on ensuring that the municipality is getting fair value for the time, effort, and costs of the city’s current efforts supplying data to other entities.

Data Fluency is an Antidote to Fear and Apathy

Data Fluency is an Antidote to Fear and Apathy

There are already more than 60 COVID-19 vaccines in the works. When interconnected individuals with a common goal pool knowledge and share their assets, we experience unparalleled advances. Data fluency is foundational to societal and civic engagement. It can invigorate constituencies and shift systemic power dynamics. At a time when we trust fewer entities to watch our backs and we can become crippled by fear and powerlessness, data fluency can help us find and activate opportunity narratives.

The prevalence of data in our lives represents the need to repeatedly evaluate trade-offs. Narratives have power, as fellow management consultant John Hagel reminds us: “every successful social movement in history has been driven at its core by a narrative that drove people to do amazing things.” Powerful narratives can drive us to act or prevent us from taking action via distraction or disinformation. Predictive analytics are being employed across many sectors, often without our knowledge and sometimes in violation of laws. In order to exercise agency, we need to understand who controls the narratives coloring our daily realities.

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