Schneider Electric’s approach to building and managing the smart city

By Jessie Feller Hahn, Executive Director, Meeting of the Minds

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds where she is responsible for identifying global urban sustainability, innovation, technology best practices and thought leadership, developing platforms for city leaders to share lessons learned, and building alliances and partnerships across and within sectors.

Jul 25, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

A new article in The Guardian assesses Schneider Electric’s approach to the smart city.

Being smart means a lot of things to Annie Xu Hongyan, the senior vice-president for the Smart Cities initiative at Schneider Electric, a French energy management company that offers infrastructure solutions to new urban problems. It means not sacrificing long-term thinking for short-term wins, being pragmatic when it comes to managing the environment but also knowing when to get personal. “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children,” says Xu, referring to a well-known idiom to explain why sustainability matters to her.

Continue reading: When sustainability becomes a duty

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