ReNew Canada asks: Will the Car Always Be King?

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Sep 23, 2011 | Announcements | 0 comments

As part of their Meeting of the Minds 2011 coverage, ReNew Canada asks their readers:

Should we be trying to further mass transit by tackling the last-mile problem or should we admit cars aren’t going anywhere and look for more efficient vehicles?

The online poll showed that 71% of their readers believe that future mobility will be a mix of personal transportation, public transportation, and car sharing. Only 2 (5%) voters felt that people will never be able to give up personal vehicles.

For further discussion on the future of the car, watch Ken Laberteaux's Meeting of the Minds 2011 presentation above, "What’s Driving the Driving in Denver? Visualizing Urbanization Trends in US Metro Regions," and read Renew Canada's poll results here.

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