ReNew Canada asks: Will the Car Always Be King?

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Sep 23, 2011 | Announcements | 0 comments

As part of their Meeting of the Minds 2011 coverage, ReNew Canada asks their readers:

Should we be trying to further mass transit by tackling the last-mile problem or should we admit cars aren’t going anywhere and look for more efficient vehicles?

The online poll showed that 71% of their readers believe that future mobility will be a mix of personal transportation, public transportation, and car sharing. Only 2 (5%) voters felt that people will never be able to give up personal vehicles.

For further discussion on the future of the car, watch Ken Laberteaux’s Meeting of the Minds 2011 presentation above, “What’s Driving the Driving in Denver? Visualizing Urbanization Trends in US Metro Regions,” and read Renew Canada’s poll results here.

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Read more from the Meeting of the Minds Blog

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

4 Reasons Why Urban Landscapes are a Linchpin for Climate Resilience

Replacing grass with climate appropriate plants (and irrigating those plants properly) can reduce a landscape’s water needs by 70-80 percent. During the last California drought, we saw homes across the state doing this, a trend significant enough to be clear on Google Maps. This was a big part of why California’s urban communities were able to meet, in fact exceed, the emergency drought mandate of reducing water use by 20 percent.

How Cities Can Benefit from International Knowledge Exchange

The use platform provides information on how to develop and implement approaches in response to complex urban issues in a local context. Each of the case studies offers a summary of a project, program or policy, including challenges, lessons learned, impacts and an assessment of the transferability potential to another location. The use platform is free and accessible to everyone who shares an interest in urban sustainability.  Search our database, join the community, and upload your project.

The 5 Transformative Urban Impacts of Cycling for Transportation

BYCS is an Amsterdam-based social enterprise driven by the belief that bicycles transform cities and cities transform the world. We work internationally with governments, businesses, and nonprofits to initiate and scale breakthrough ideas that accelerate cycling in cities. We then invest our profits into game-changing programs that can be adopted around the world.

Share This