Raw Video and Slidedecks from Meeting of the Minds 2014

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Oct 3, 2014 | Smart Cities | 0 comments

Over the next few weeks we will process, archive and report on the take-aways, media coverage and videos from Meeting of the Minds 2014. While we work on presenting this material, we want to make the raw files available to our network. Below are PDF slideshows from our presenters, as well as the archive video of our live webcast.

PDF Slidedecks

Opening Reception Presentation
Gordon Feller

Opening Reception Presentation
Randy Doyle

More than Just Dirt: Food, Community and the New Economy
Pashon Murray

Leading from Local Circumstance: Lessons from Detroit
Rip Rapson

Breaking Down the Silos: DTE Energy’s Partnership with Tech Innovators
Russ Vanos

Mandela’s Unfinished Business: Housing Needs and the Spatial Legacy of Apartheid in South Africa
Nicolette Naylor

The Internet of Everything Changes Everything: Driving New Business Models for Urban Services
Wim Elfrink

Dancing With Giants: Two of the World’s Biggest Companies Embrace the Future
Niel Golightly presentation slides

Dancing With Giants: Two of the World’s Biggest Companies Embrace the Future
Nihar Patel presentation slides

Climate Preparedness and Resiliency in Urban America
Mayor Dawn Zimmer

Inventing New Futures: Real Life Lessons from Science & Tech-Based Business Innovation
Sean O’Sullivan

Breaking Down the Silos: DTE Energy’s Partnership with Tech Innovators
Russ Vanos

Meeting of the Minds 2015 Announcement: Continuing the Conversation
Mayor Gayle McLaughlin

A Global Challenge: How Do We Make the Right Decisions?
Jeremy Bentham

The Coming Revolution: Small-Scale Urban Industrial Development
Ilana Preuss

Video

October 1 – Hackathon Presentations

October 1, 2014: 8:30 – 10:00am

October 1, 2014: 10:30 – 12:00pm

October 2, 2014: 8:30 – 10:00am

October 2, 2014: 10:30 – 12:00pm

October 2, 2014: 1:00 – 2pm

October 2, 2014: 2:00 – 4pm

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