Ramping up Renewables: A New Report from Deutsche Bank Climate Change Advisors

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Jul 24, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

A new report by Deutsche Bank Climate Change Advisors worth checking out:

The US Partnership for Renewable Energy Finance (US PREF) has published a new paper examining how state-level Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs are making the US power supply more diverse, secure, and sustainable.

Continue reading: Ramping up Renewables: Leveraging State RPS Programs amid Uncertain Federal Support

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