Qualcomm Seeks to Improve Network by 1000x in 10 Years

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Oct 12, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

Speaking at Meeting of the Minds in San Francisco, Qualcomm CTO Matt Grob laid out a plan to improve Qualcomm’s network capacity over the next ten years by working smarter, not harder.

ZDnet.com covered the presentation in their article, Qualcomm CTO talks meeting growing network capacity needs in cities.

From the article:

The ultimate goal, Grob said, is to increase the supply of bandwidth and bits as fast as demand goes up so the price doesn’t go up.

“We want to keep the service plans and those kinds of things at current rates or lower despite the demand that could drive them up,” Grob affirmed.

He pointed out that we’re already seeing strains on wireless networks with data caps from providers. Grob add that’s why Qualcomm is introducing small base stations.

The interest in Qualcomm’s announcement was felt on Twitter, with a flurry of tweets repeating the 1000x in 10 years plan. Meeting participants on Twitter also buzzed about Qualcomm’s new cellular bay stations, which are the size of a deck of cards and can be installed indoors – effectively neutralizing the “mobile mismatch” problem explained here by KC Boyce:

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