Ontario’s $50 Million Smart Grid Fund 2013

By Gordon Feller

Gordon Feller is the Co-Founder of Meeting of the Minds, a global thought leadership network and knowledge-sharing platform focused on the future of sustainable cities, innovation and technology.

Jul 16, 2013 | Announcements | 0 comments

The Government of Ontario launched the second round of a $50 million Smart Grid Fund (SGF). The SGF will support high-value opportunities to advance energy innovation in Ontario. The Ministry of Energy will award the funding in the form of a conditional grant.

The SGF is divided into two project categories: Capacity Building and Demonstration.

Capacity Building

Within the Capacity Building category the eligibility requirements for Capacity Building SGF projects entail the following features:

  • A maximum project timeframe of 2 years.
  • A minimum project total of $500,000

SGF will fund up to 50% of eligible project costs, to a maximum of $4 million per project. Projects seeking less that 50% are preferred.

Organizations applying must have at least two years of active operations and have other products or services at the commercial stage. This requirement does not apply to subsidiaries of established organizations.

Demonstration

Within the Demonstration category the minimum project total is $250,000.  The eligibility requirements for Demonstration SGF projects are:

  • A maximum project timeframe of 2 years
  • A minimum project total of $250,000

SGF will fund up to 50% of eligible costs, to a maximum of $4 million per project.

Collaboration with an electricity utility is required for all demonstration projects.

In both instances the SGF will fund up to 50% of eligible project costs, to a maximum of $4 million per project. Since its inception in 2011, the SGF has supported nine successful projects with twelve electrical utilities.

Non-Canadian companies have the opportunity to partner with Canadian companies and supply:

  • Technologies related to Smart Grid development
  • electrical equipment, products, components and materials
  • electrical engineering assistance

SGF supports high-value opportunities to advance energy innovation in Ontario. The SGF is a discretionary, non-entitlement program administered by the Ministry of Energy of Ontario. Funding is awarded on a competitive basis in the form of a conditional grant. The SGF is divided into two project categories: Capacity Building and Demonstration. Lead Applicants must select one project category for their project. Projects submitted for both categories will not be accepted.

Since the launch in 2011, the SGF has supported nine projects from various smart grid technology areas, involving partnerships with 12 electricity utilities. The nine successful projects have been focused on two-way flow between the consumer and their utility, grid automation, connecting clean and efficient resources to the grid, and the use of data generated by smart meters and electricity grid assets.

The Smart Grid Fund supports Ontario-based projects that test, develop and bring to market the next generation of smart grid solutions. This round of funding will support advanced energy technology projects, such as energy storage and electric vehicle integration. Supported by investments such as Ontario’s 4.7 million smart meters, the smart grid connects the electricity system with new technologies and sources of information to help reduce service disruptions, increase conservation capacity, waste less energy and increase grid security. Smart grid technologies also provide consumers with conservation tools that allow for more efficient electricity use and help manage costs. Within SGF there is a strong focus on advancing Ontario’s Smart Grid communication system. Projects solely focused on the development of Distributed Energy resources and failing to incorporate advanced communication technology will be deemed ineligible for funding.

Successful “Lead Applicants” must present a firm agreement between the “Lead Applicant” and the utility (Memorandum of Understanding, statement of work, or firm letter of support).

The SGF is accessible to applicants that are Ontario registered companies. U.S. companies may partner with an Ontario company that will act as a Lead Applicant. U.S. companies may use this opportunity for supplying technologies, products, and services. Applications are open until 400pm Toronto time on September 6th.

More information

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Read more from the Meeting of the Minds Blog

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States

Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States

Today, over 2 million Americans are living without access to clean, running water. The newly released ‘Close The Water Gap’ report by DigDeep and the US Water Alliance pulls back the veil on America’s hidden water crisis.

This is the first-ever comprehensive look at indoor water access across the United States, and its findings are explosive: Race is the strongest predictor of vulnerability. In six states (plus Puerto Rico), progress is actually backsliding. More than 44 million Americans are served by water systems with recent violations of the Safe Drinking Water Act.

The Link Between Climate Change & Water

The Link Between Climate Change & Water

When thinking about conserving water, we should also be focusing on how more efficient water use correlates with energy savings. Studies show that when households participate in water savings programs, they also conserve energy and reduce strain on the power grid during peak demand periods while saving consumers money on their utility bills.

Water utilities can also dramatically increase their energy efficiency and reduce overall energy usage by adopting locally based solutions. For many municipal governments, drinking water and wastewater treatment plants are typically the largest energy consumers, often accounting for 30 to 40 percent of total energy consumed. Overall, drinking water and wastewater systems account for approximately two percent of energy use in the United States, adding over 45 million tons of greenhouse gases annually.

Using Data to Reduce Public Health Risk

Using Data to Reduce Public Health Risk

Addressing the impact of heat on health is well-aligned with MCDPH’s vision and mission “to make healthy lives possible” by protecting and promoting the health and well-being of MC residents and visitors. The climate has significant impacts on our community’s health. Through extensive surveillance and community surveys, we have demonstrated the importance of local public health data to increase buy-in from new and existing partners and obtain funding to address this significant public health issue. We encourage other health departments to consider the power of data and collaboration as they seek methods for protecting the public’s health from a changing climate.

Share This