New Global Platform: Helping City Leaders Achieve Smart City Goals

By Gordon Feller

Gordon Feller is the Co-Founder of Meeting of the Minds, a global thought leadership network and knowledge-sharing platform focused on the future of sustainable cities, innovation and technology.

Jan 18, 2016 | Smart Cities | 1 comment

A new online community WorldSmartCity.org will be launched on 18 January by the IEC in partnership with ISO and ITU.

The extended leadership network will engage city stakeholders, on a global basis. WorldSmartCity.org is hosting and organizing a range of in-depth discussions that add value for these leaders, providing much more than a high-level networking platform. It will focus on the top “pain points” that hold back smart city development in four areas:

  • Mobility
  • Water
  • Energy
  • Cybersecurity and privacy

WorldSmartCity.org is organizing monthly live discussions with and for city leaders. These Google-hangouts are scheduled to take place on:

  • 18 February
  • 18 March
  • 18 April
  • 18 May
  • 17 June

Details of speakers and programme are posted at www.WorldSmartCity.org/hangouts/

You can follow the Hangouts, in real-time also via Twitter, using the Forum’s hashtag #WorldSmartCity2016.

With their contributions, WorldSmartCity.org community members are helping shape the final programme of the first World Smart City Forum, which will take place on 13 July in Singapore. This special event is co-located with the World Cities Summit www.worldcitiessummit.com.sg/ and Singapore International Water Week www.siwww.com.sg.

Why bother with all of this? The key organizations behind this initiative believe that significant efficiency improvements will come when city systems are both physically and virtually connected. This is easier said than done; most such systems have been designed and installed by different suppliers. We will explore how interconnections can be accomplished. We will point to some tools which are already available to help cities reach their objectives faster, more efficiently and with better outcomes.

Both the Forum and the community will be getting support from Meeting of the Minds. We’re encouraging everyone to get involved – we want you to share your point of view.

Discussion

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1 Comment

  1. The World Smart City Forum promises to become an important forum for discussing solutions and opportunities surrounding the four major “pain points” confronting cities around the world as it seeks to promote holistic approaches to how urban communities can move forward. As Feller fully appreciates, solutions depend on the robust and fruitful interaction of new technologies and communities. To fulfill their potential, new technologies require the transparency and accountability provided by good governance and citizen engagement. Collaborative leadership, as understood here, holds a key to improved sustainability and resilience over the long term.

    Reply

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