Meeting of the Minds Blog Magazine, Vol. 1

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Jul 8, 2013 | Announcements | 0 comments

We’re releasing a new tool this week that will help you get ready for Meeting of the Minds 2013 in Toronto.

Our blog here at CityMinded.org has grown incredibly in the last 6 months—hosting discussions from foundations, private sector leaders, independent thought leaders and event government agencies like USAID, HUD and the State Department.

New Formats

As I talk with our bloggers and partners and others, though, I know that some of you would like to have more format options for our blog posts. “Can you send it to me in a PDF?” is a common request.

The answer is yes! At the end of each of our blog posts there is a link that says, “Click here to download a printable, PDF version of this article.” Clicking the link will automatically provide you with a printable, PDF version.

But what about other formats? We recently began releasing podcasts. We have monthly webinars. Of course we have our video (with transcripts) of previous Meeting of the Minds talks. We have photos from past events. For face-to-face time we organize monthly meetups in San Francisco and elsewhere.

Brand new this week, we’re releasing a PDF magazine that you can print or read on your mobile device (it looks great on an iPad). I gathered some of my favorite blog posts and created a 30-page PDF magazine that you can download and take with you. The magazine will give you a good idea of the kind of discussions that we have at Meeting of the Minds, as well as the kind of people that make up our community.

Click here to download Volume 1.

Volume 1

Screen Shot 2013-07-07 at 11.30.06 PM
Screen Shot 2013-07-07 at 11.30.19 PM
Screen Shot 2013-07-07 at 11.30.45 PM

In Volume 1 we hear from thought leaders in the following topics:

  • Government & entrepreneurship
  • Transportation
  • The future of work
  • City infrastructure
  • The internet of things
  • Social equity
  • Energy
  • Environment

The magazine includes articles from Meeting of the Minds delegates and speakers like Julie Lein and Charles Rutheiser. It’s a great way to get ready for our Meeting this September.

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read more from MeetingoftheMinds.org

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

Smart Cities & Public Health Emergency Collaboration Framework

Smart Cities & Public Health Emergency Collaboration Framework

Based on our observations and experiences, we’ve written a white paper describing a Smart City-Public Health Emergency collaboration framework. We define a structured approach to broadly consider and maximize collaboration opportunities between the smart city innovation community and municipalities for the COVID-19 outbreak. It integrates the CDC Public Health Emergency and Response Capabilities standards with components of a smart city innovation ecosystem. The CDC defined capability standards are organized into six domains. Each intersection in the framework represents a collaboration point where the smart city’s innovation ecosystem and digital capabilities can be used to augment the municipalities’ public health emergency response needs.

COVID-19 is Creating the Largest Ever Telecommunity, But Not for Everyone

COVID-19 is Creating the Largest Ever Telecommunity, But Not for Everyone

Social distancing is becoming the new normal, at least for those of us who are heeding the Center for Disease Control’s warnings and guidelines. But if you don’t have reliable, high-speed broadband, it is impossible to engage in what is now the world’s largest telecommunity. As many schools and universities around the world (including those of my kids) are shut down, these institutions are optimistically converting to online and digital learning. However, with our current broadband layout, this movement will certainly leave many Americans behind.

How to Move More People with Fewer Vehicles

How to Move More People with Fewer Vehicles

Accenture analysts recently released a report calling for cities to take the lead in creating coordinated, “orchestrated” mobility ecosystems. Limiting shared services to routes that connect people with mass transit would be one way to deploy human-driven services now and to prepare for driverless service in the future. Services and schedules can be linked at the backend, and operators can, for example, automatically send more shared vehicles to a train station when the train has more passengers than usual, or tell the shared vehicles to wait for a train that is running late.

Managing urban congestion and mobility comes down to the matter of managing space. Cities are characterized by defined and restricted residential, commercial, and transportation spaces. Private autos are the most inefficient use of transportation space, and mass transit represents the most efficient use of transportation space. Getting more people out of private cars, and into shared feeder routes to and from mass transit modes is the most promising way to reduce auto traffic. Computer models show that it can be done, and we don’t need autonomous vehicles to realize the benefits of shared mobility.

Share This