The IwB is Calling for Curriculum Partners for the 2014-2015 Academic Year

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Dec 9, 2013 | Announcements | 0 comments

The Institute without Boundaries (IwB) is seeking curriculum partners for Connecting Divided Places, a project that investigates social, economic, environmental, and cultural divisions in cities. They are calling out to municipalities, not-for-profit organizations, and companies interested in working to address the wicked problems dividing their cities and regions. The IwB is looking for organizations interested in collaborating on design solutions that make for more balanced, healthier, and resilient city-regions of the future.

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What challenges is your city is facing?

Interested organizations are invited to submit Expression of Interest (EOI) to take part in our 2014-2015 Connecting Divided Places project.

The deadline to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) is Monday, January 13, 2014.

Additional information and the EOI submission form are available at: www.institutewithoutboundaries.com.

About the IwB

The IwB offers over a decade of expertise working with municipalities, industry, and various not-for-profit organizations. It is a unique research centre, design studio, and an academic program based in Toronto that focuses on collaborative design practice with the objectives of social, ecological and economic innovation through design research and strategy.

They have worked with public partners such as the Dublin City Council in Ireland, the City of Markham in Canada, the City of Lota in Chile, as well as the Costa Rican Ministries of Culture and Housing. They have also worked with not-for-profit and private partners like Bruce Mau Design Studio, Evergreen Canada, Canon, Arup, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), Habitat for Humanity, and the Harbinger Foundation. They’ve conducted diverse projects, from delivering master plans to communities in need of restructuring, to prototyping innovative housing solutions, to improving municipal service delivery, and exploring and giving new significance to local historical landmarks and districts.

Interested in the IwB’s work, but not sure next year’s project is a good fit? Contact them at: www.institutewithoutboundaries.com.

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