The IwB is Calling for Curriculum Partners for the 2014-2015 Academic Year

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Dec 9, 2013 | Announcements | 0 comments

The Institute without Boundaries (IwB) is seeking curriculum partners for Connecting Divided Places, a project that investigates social, economic, environmental, and cultural divisions in cities. They are calling out to municipalities, not-for-profit organizations, and companies interested in working to address the wicked problems dividing their cities and regions. The IwB is looking for organizations interested in collaborating on design solutions that make for more balanced, healthier, and resilient city-regions of the future.

Screen Shot 2013-12-09 at 12.30.11 PM

What challenges is your city is facing?

Interested organizations are invited to submit Expression of Interest (EOI) to take part in our 2014-2015 Connecting Divided Places project.

The deadline to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) is Monday, January 13, 2014.

Additional information and the EOI submission form are available at: www.institutewithoutboundaries.com.

About the IwB

The IwB offers over a decade of expertise working with municipalities, industry, and various not-for-profit organizations. It is a unique research centre, design studio, and an academic program based in Toronto that focuses on collaborative design practice with the objectives of social, ecological and economic innovation through design research and strategy.

They have worked with public partners such as the Dublin City Council in Ireland, the City of Markham in Canada, the City of Lota in Chile, as well as the Costa Rican Ministries of Culture and Housing. They have also worked with not-for-profit and private partners like Bruce Mau Design Studio, Evergreen Canada, Canon, Arup, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), Habitat for Humanity, and the Harbinger Foundation. They’ve conducted diverse projects, from delivering master plans to communities in need of restructuring, to prototyping innovative housing solutions, to improving municipal service delivery, and exploring and giving new significance to local historical landmarks and districts.

Interested in the IwB’s work, but not sure next year’s project is a good fit? Contact them at: www.institutewithoutboundaries.com.

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read more from MeetingoftheMinds.org

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

If Companies Want a Diverse Workforce, They Need to Pay Attention to Transportation

If Companies Want a Diverse Workforce, They Need to Pay Attention to Transportation

A new toolkit has been developed to help businesses think through strategies to decrease mobility barriers to the workplace, which reduces turnover. When workers can reliably get to work regardless of their personal circumstances, it provides employment stability and the opportunity to build wealth. It’s a win-win. Developed through a partnership between Metropolitan Planning Council and a pro bono Boston Consulting Group team, the toolkit includes slide decks, an overview report, customizable templates, a cost calculator, and instructional videos walking a company through the thought process of establishing a baseline situation, evaluating and selecting a solution, and standing up a program.

Depending on the employer’s location and employees’ needs, solutions may range from helping with last-mile transportation to the transit system, to developing on-demand vanpools, to establishing in-house carpool matching systems. The ROI calculator gives employers the ability to determine the break-even cost—the subsidy amount a company can manage without hurting the bottom line.

How Affordable Green Housing Enhances Cities

How Affordable Green Housing Enhances Cities

Housing that is affordable to low-income residents is often substandard and suffering from deferred maintenance, exposing residents to poor air quality and high energy bills. This situation can exacerbate asthma and other respiratory health issues, and siphon scarce dollars from higher value items like more nutritious food, health care, or education. Providing safe, decent, affordable, and healthy housing is one way to address historic inequities in community investment. Engaging with affordable housing and other types of community benefit projects is an important first step toward fully integrating equity into the green building process. In creating a framework for going deeper on equity, our new book, the Blueprint for Affordable Housing (Island Press 2020), starts with the Convention on Human Rights and the fundamental right to housing.  

Johannesburg and Maputo Partner to Research Transport Needs and Investments

Johannesburg and Maputo Partner to Research Transport Needs and Investments

I caught up recently with Sarah Charlton who is Associate Professor at the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg.

The research she is leading, located in both Johannesburg, South Africa and Maputo, Mozambique, looks at the interface between the mobility use by residents and transportation investments by the state. The question guiding her research is “are ordinary households using the transport modes that the government is investing in and prioritizing?” The research is a partnership between two universities across two countries and two cities.

Sarah reflects on research during the pandemic across languages, countries, histories and cultures.

The Future of Cities

Mayors, planners, futurists, technologists, executives and advocates — hundreds of urban thought leaders publish on Meeting of the Minds. Sign up below to follow the future of cities.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Share This