The IwB is Calling for Curriculum Partners for the 2014-2015 Academic Year

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Dec 9, 2013 | Announcements | 0 comments

The Institute without Boundaries (IwB) is seeking curriculum partners for Connecting Divided Places, a project that investigates social, economic, environmental, and cultural divisions in cities. They are calling out to municipalities, not-for-profit organizations, and companies interested in working to address the wicked problems dividing their cities and regions. The IwB is looking for organizations interested in collaborating on design solutions that make for more balanced, healthier, and resilient city-regions of the future.

Screen Shot 2013-12-09 at 12.30.11 PM

What challenges is your city is facing?

Interested organizations are invited to submit Expression of Interest (EOI) to take part in our 2014-2015 Connecting Divided Places project.

The deadline to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) is Monday, January 13, 2014.

Additional information and the EOI submission form are available at: www.institutewithoutboundaries.com.

About the IwB

The IwB offers over a decade of expertise working with municipalities, industry, and various not-for-profit organizations. It is a unique research centre, design studio, and an academic program based in Toronto that focuses on collaborative design practice with the objectives of social, ecological and economic innovation through design research and strategy.

They have worked with public partners such as the Dublin City Council in Ireland, the City of Markham in Canada, the City of Lota in Chile, as well as the Costa Rican Ministries of Culture and Housing. They have also worked with not-for-profit and private partners like Bruce Mau Design Studio, Evergreen Canada, Canon, Arup, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), Habitat for Humanity, and the Harbinger Foundation. They’ve conducted diverse projects, from delivering master plans to communities in need of restructuring, to prototyping innovative housing solutions, to improving municipal service delivery, and exploring and giving new significance to local historical landmarks and districts.

Interested in the IwB’s work, but not sure next year’s project is a good fit? Contact them at: www.institutewithoutboundaries.com.

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read more from MeetingoftheMinds.org

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

COVID-19 is Creating the Largest Ever Telecommunity, But Not for Everyone

COVID-19 is Creating the Largest Ever Telecommunity, But Not for Everyone

Social distancing is becoming the new normal, at least for those of us who are heeding the Center for Disease Control’s warnings and guidelines. But if you don’t have reliable, high-speed broadband, it is impossible to engage in what is now the world’s largest telecommunity. As many schools and universities around the world (including those of my kids) are shut down, these institutions are optimistically converting to online and digital learning. However, with our current broadband layout, this movement will certainly leave many Americans behind.

How to Move More People with Fewer Vehicles

How to Move More People with Fewer Vehicles

Accenture analysts recently released a report calling for cities to take the lead in creating coordinated, “orchestrated” mobility ecosystems. Limiting shared services to routes that connect people with mass transit would be one way to deploy human-driven services now and to prepare for driverless service in the future. Services and schedules can be linked at the backend, and operators can, for example, automatically send more shared vehicles to a train station when the train has more passengers than usual, or tell the shared vehicles to wait for a train that is running late.

Managing urban congestion and mobility comes down to the matter of managing space. Cities are characterized by defined and restricted residential, commercial, and transportation spaces. Private autos are the most inefficient use of transportation space, and mass transit represents the most efficient use of transportation space. Getting more people out of private cars, and into shared feeder routes to and from mass transit modes is the most promising way to reduce auto traffic. Computer models show that it can be done, and we don’t need autonomous vehicles to realize the benefits of shared mobility.

Planning for Arts and Culture in San Diego

Planning for Arts and Culture in San Diego

The role of government, and the planning community, is perhaps to facilitate these kinds of partnerships and make it easier for serendipity to occur. While many cities mandate a portion of the development budget toward art, this will not necessarily result in an ongoing benefit to the arts community as in most cases the budget is used for public art projects versus creating opportunities for cultural programming.  

Rather than relying solely on this mandate, planners might want to consider educating developers with examples and case studies about the myriad ways that artists can participate in the development process. Likewise, outreach and education for the arts community about what role they can play in projects may stimulate a dialogue that can yield great results. In this sense, the planning community can be an invaluable translator in helping all parties to discover a richer, more inspiring, common language.

Share This