IT in Canada interviews Bill Reinert

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Oct 5, 2011 | Announcements | 0 comments

After Bill’s presentation Changing Cities – Changing Cars, Mary Allen of IT in Canada Magazine interviewed Bill Reinert about the future of personal vehicles.

An excerpt from the accompanying article:

The underlying premise of the “Changing Cities – Changing Cars” session was that cars can be viewed as more than a destructive source of emissions, personal injury and traffic congestion. As Bill Reinert, national manager of advanced technology, Toyota Motor Sales USA and one of the fathers of the Prius, explained, “a rapid transit bus with one passenger is one of the most ineffective ways in the world that we can move people around, and it’s the same thing with the train. Cars done properly can be an effective means of distributed mass transit.”

[fancy_link link=”http://sustainability.itincanada.ca/index.php?cid=401&id=14883″]Continue reading[/fancy_link]

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