Is CareerBuilder a City Builder?

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Nov 7, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

While on our scouting trip to Toronto this week for Meeting of the Minds 2013, we visited the Careerbuilder offices to talk about cities and urban innovation.

Did you know that CareerBuilder recently acquired the big-data analysis company Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI)? What is EMSI and why does this matter to cities?

EMSI is a specialist in employment data and analysis. They take huge datasets containing information about jobs and create reports about, for instance, the job placement rates of difference colleges or the oversupply of talent in different cities.

They can tell a software company, for example, that City A has an abundant talent pool of software developers and not enough jobs – and City B already has a lot of software jobs and a high level of competition (and turnover) for talent. If that company is looking to open a satellite office and one of these cities, this information could be invaluable to their operations.

Will CareerBuilder, in effect, become a city builder? It’s possible. Their unique insights might be able to help boost local economies and the lives of people that depend on them.

It’s another example of big data helping shape a smarter, more efficient future for cities and citizens.

For more information, read the CareerBuilder official announcement.

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