illuminating ideas: ENERGY & Sustainability Summit

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Apr 2, 2014 | Announcements | 0 comments

Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 7:30am to Noon, Oakland Convention Center (1001 Broadway, Oakland)

The Oakland Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce presents an educational half day economic development summit on April 16. This exciting event will explore how energy, sustainability and green technology are contributing to economic growth in the East Bay and surrounding areas. With a keynote address by immediate past Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Jon Wellinghoff.

EdSummit2014_Logo

Other speakers include: 

  • Jon Wellinghoff, immediate past Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Keynote)
  • Garrick Brown, Cassidy Turley Real Estate
  • Arrietta Chakos, Principal, Urban Resilience Strategies
  • Mike D’Orazi, Fire Chief, City of Alameda
  • Larry Goldzband, Executive Director, BCDC
  • Dan Halperin, Director, Distributed Generation, Pacific Gas and Electric
  • Rebecca Rubin Founder, President and CEO of Marstel-Day, LLC (Moderator)
  • Robert R. Davenport, III, Managing Partner, Brightpath Capital Partners
  • Susan Robinson, Federal Public Affairs Director and Sustainability Lead, Waste Management
  • Richard Sinkoff, Director of Environmental Programs and Planning, Port of Oakland
  • Bob Thronson, Vice President, Vigilent
  • Emily Kirsch, Cofounder and CEO, SfunCube (Moderator)

More information: http://bit.ly/OE95gU

Registration information: http://bit.ly/1fulE3z

 

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