illuminating ideas: ENERGY & Sustainability Summit

By Jessie Feller Hahn, Executive Director, Meeting of the Minds

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds where she is responsible for identifying global urban sustainability, innovation, technology best practices and thought leadership, developing platforms for city leaders to share lessons learned, and building alliances and partnerships across and within sectors.

Apr 2, 2014 | Announcements | 0 comments


Who will you meet?

Cities are innovating, companies are pivoting, and start-ups are growing. Like you, every urban practitioner has a remarkable story of insight and challenge from the past year.

Meet these peers and discuss the future of cities in the new Meeting of the Minds Executive Cohort Program. Replace boring virtual summits with facilitated, online, small-group discussions where you can make real connections with extraordinary, like-minded people.


 

Wednesday, April 16, 2014, 7:30am to Noon, Oakland Convention Center (1001 Broadway, Oakland)

The Oakland Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce presents an educational half day economic development summit on April 16. This exciting event will explore how energy, sustainability and green technology are contributing to economic growth in the East Bay and surrounding areas. With a keynote address by immediate past Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Jon Wellinghoff.

EdSummit2014_Logo

Other speakers include: 

  • Jon Wellinghoff, immediate past Chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Keynote)
  • Garrick Brown, Cassidy Turley Real Estate
  • Arrietta Chakos, Principal, Urban Resilience Strategies
  • Mike D’Orazi, Fire Chief, City of Alameda
  • Larry Goldzband, Executive Director, BCDC
  • Dan Halperin, Director, Distributed Generation, Pacific Gas and Electric
  • Rebecca Rubin Founder, President and CEO of Marstel-Day, LLC (Moderator)
  • Robert R. Davenport, III, Managing Partner, Brightpath Capital Partners
  • Susan Robinson, Federal Public Affairs Director and Sustainability Lead, Waste Management
  • Richard Sinkoff, Director of Environmental Programs and Planning, Port of Oakland
  • Bob Thronson, Vice President, Vigilent
  • Emily Kirsch, Cofounder and CEO, SfunCube (Moderator)

More information: http://bit.ly/OE95gU

Registration information: http://bit.ly/1fulE3z

 

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Well, I’m one of the latter and Meeting of the Minds thought it would be valuable to republish an article I penned in January 2020. In that ancient past, only the most studious of news observers had heard of a virus in Wuhan, China, that was causing a lethal disease. Two months later we were in lockdown, all over the world, and while things have improved a lot in the US since November 2020, in many cities and nations around the world this is not the case. India is living through a COVID nightmare of untold proportions as we speak, and many nations have gone through wave after wave of this pandemic. The end is not in sight. It is not over. Not by a longshot.

And while the pandemic is raging, sea level continues to rise, heatwaves are killing people in one hemisphere or the other, droughts have devastated farmers, floods sent people fleeing to disaster shelters that are not the save havens we once thought them to be, wildfires consumed forests and all too many homes, and emissions dipped temporarily only to shoot up again as we try to go “back to normal.”

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