Growing Urban Food Systems

By Shaina Kandel

Shaina Kandel is pursuing an MBA in Sustainable Management at the Presidio Graduate School in San Francisco. She has a background in Organizational Development and Healthcare Consulting. She is passionate about creating sustainable food systems and improving the health and wellbeing of our communities.

Sep 3, 2014 | Smart Cities | 1 comment

There is a growing buzz around strengthening urban food systems. Consumers want more transparency in where their food is coming from and how it is being made. They are voting with their dollars by purchasing from local producers. A University of Kentucky study shows that Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs) grew 50% between 2007 and 2009. Similarly, cities are looking to solve issues of food deserts and inequitable access to food, with San Francisco just passing an ordinance providing tax incentives to urban agricultural zones. In order to fulfill the food goals of consumers and cities, there must be infrastructure to support urban food systems.

Photo Credit: Lacocina.org

Photo Credit: Lacocina.org

This past Sunday, on a foggy morning in San Francisco, La Cocina, a food incubator for low-income food entrepreneurs, hosted its 5th annual Food + Entrepreneurship Conference. Uniquely positioned as a non-profit that provides food producers with access to kitchen space, investment, and customers, La Cocina is building the Bay Area’s local food economy one entrepreneur at a time. La Cocina is interconnected in a web of players who all came together for the conference, including food producers, distributors, wholesalers, innovators, policy makers, and investors for a diverse and juicy conversation.

Geetika Agrawal, La Cocina’s Senior Program Manager explained that the 2014 conference was inspired by a question that the organization has been grappling with over the past year, how to grow a great environment for good food, with good food meaning good for the environment, healthy for consumers, and creating a livelihood for the producer. The conversation on how to cultivate this type of environment is largely tied to urban infrastructure.

Photo Credit: Sergio Ruiz

Photo Credit: Sergio Ruiz

In 2013, San Francisco based Spur, a research, education and advocacy non-profit focused on solving urban problems, released Locally Nourished, a report on strengthening the Bay Area’s regional food system. Spur’s third recommendation focused on building out the infrastructure of the local food economy to “promote forming, retaining, and expanding businesses that provide food processing, manufacturing, and distribution.” Creating a thriving local food system requires investment in all the players that form the infrastructure of an urban food economy.

Spur also mentioned the importance of a regional agribusiness economic development organization to provide financial support, regional business exchange, and agritourism initiatives. A regional agribusiness organization would create infrastructure in the form of networking and information sharing amongst players in the regional food economy. This type of infrastructure would create connective tissue between organizations, allowing individual players to think and act systemically towards larger goals. Without industry associations, there is no infrastructure to turn individual food producers, processors, and distributors into a regional system.

Technology is also having an impact on the infrastructure of urban food systems. Companies like Farmigo and Good Eggs are using software to allow consumers to purchase directly from the food growers and producers. Benzi Ronzi, co-founder of Farmigo, explained at La Cocina’s conference that, “Software has the ability to collapse the food supply chain.” By consumers choosing to purchase directly from farmers, it eliminates price cuts that occur from middle players and more money goes to the producer. However, this strategy is based on what Benzi calls “economies of communities.” It requires the consumer to be part of the solution by choosing to pick up their food at central locations in their community instead of using home delivered groceries. The software provides the virtual infrastructure to build and grow local food communities.

Even with innovation in physical and virtual infrastructure for urban food systems, equitable access is still a concern. Many communities in the US are not only located in food deserts but also face issues of limited computer literacy or limited access to Internet. These issues inhibit their ability to access good food through online platforms, like Farmigo or Good Eggs. Organizations such as The Corbin Hill Food Project in Harlem, New York are popping up to change this reality. Corbin Hill Farm links farms in upstate New York to community organizations in underserved areas of the city to make local produce accessible for neighborhoods like Harlem and the Bronx. The Corbin Hill Food Project actually leverages Farmigo’s technology to make this possible. While there is still a long way to go before all communities have equitable access to local food systems, organizations like Corbin Hill are yet another key player in making it possible.

Photo Credit: Albert Law

Photo Credit: Albert Law

The infrastructure required to support an urban food system is by far more than brick and mortar. It takes on the form of non-profits that incubate food entrepreneurs, investment in processors and distributors, trade associations to organize the regional system, technology to collapse the supply chain, and social enterprises that bring local food to underserved communities. It requires the collaboration and effort of public and private entities and an educated consumer base that wants to support local businesses.

This all ties back to the hard work of organizations like La Cocina who are looking to not only support entrepreneurs but also create thriving, inclusive communities. In a conference session on The Future of Buying Food, Kevin Watt of Early Bird Ranch said it best, “Agriculture has the word culture in it because it is all pervasive.”  How we choose to build the infrastructure of our food system and how we choose to organize our communities around food will have a significant impact on the resiliency of our local economies, our health, and our environment.

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

1 Comment

  1. As our communities are becoming more compact, so must our farms. Food needs to be grown where the people live. Growing in one location and transporting food 1500 miles to the urban centers is no longer a viable means of providing for our families and businesses.
    The tech industry has revolutionized every industry except farming. That is now beginning to change. Not just in use of more efficient machinery but in new innovative methods of production. Aquaponic farming is merely one aspect of this new induction of technology to farming. Bring it on!

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Read more from MeetingoftheMinds.org

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

How Stormwater Infrastructure Balances Utility and Placemaking

How Stormwater Infrastructure Balances Utility and Placemaking

I see the outcomes of Duke Pond as a representation of the importance of the profession of landscape architecture in today’s world. Once obscured by the glaring light and booming voice long-generated by building architects, landscape architects are steadily emerging as the designers needed to tackle complex 21st century problems. As both leaders and collaborators, their work is addressing the effects of rising sea level on coastal cities, creating multi-modal pedestrian and vehicular transportation systems to reduce carbon emissions, reimagining outdated infrastructure as great urban places, and as with the case of Duke Pond, mitigating the impacts of worsening drought.

The 7 Forces of Artificial Intelligence in Cities

The 7 Forces of Artificial Intelligence in Cities

AI has enormous potential to improve the lives of billions of people living in cities and facing a multitude of challenges. However, a blind focus on the technological issues is not sufficient. We are already starting to see a moderation of the technocentric view of algorithmic salvation in New York City, which is the first city in the world to appoint a chief algorithm officer.

There are 7 primary forces determining the success of AI, of which technology is just one. Cities must realize that AI is not the quick technological fix that vendors sell. Not everything will be improved by creating more algorithms and technical prowess. We need to develop a more holistic approach to implementing AI in cities in order to harness the immense potential. We need to create a way to consider each of the seven forces when cities plan for the use of AI.

I Am The River, The River is Me: Prioritizing Well-being Through Water Policy

I Am The River, The River is Me: Prioritizing Well-being Through Water Policy

In New Zealand, persistent, concentrated advocacy and legal cases advanced by Māori people are inspiring biocentric policies; that is, those which recognize that people and nature, including living and non-living elements, are part of an interconnected whole. Along the way, tribal leaders and advocates are successfully making the case that nature; whole systems of rivers, lakes, forests, mountains, and more, deserves legal standing to ensure its protection. An early legislative “win” granted personhood status to the Te Urewera forest in 2014, which codified into law these moving lines:

“Te Urewera is ancient and enduring, a fortress of nature, alive with history; its scenery is abundant with mystery, adventure, and remote beauty … Te Urewera has an identity in and of itself, inspiring people to commit to its care.”

The Te Urewera Act of 2014 did more than redefine how a forest would be managed, it pushed forward the practical expression of a new policy paradigm.

Share This