Graphic Artist Brings Creative Visuals to Meeting of the Minds 2012

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Oct 15, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

Graphic artist Leah Silverman was on hand last week in San Francisco for Meeting of the Minds 2012. She lent her talents to the breakout session, Smart Cities of Tomorrow – Integrated Operations across Service Areas to Meet the Needs of Citizens, a discussion led by IBM’s Christian Clauss.

The resulting sketches add a beautiful and dynamic visual to what was an excellent discussion in open data, silo-breaking and sustainable economic growth.

[fancy_images width=”180″ height=”180″]
[image title=”Smarter Cities of Tomorrow, Sketch #1″ alt=”Smarter Cities of Tomorrow, Sketch #1″]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/clauss_workshop_a1.jpg[/image]
[image title=”Smarter Cities of Tomorrow, Sketch #2″ alt=”Smarter Cities of Tomorrow, Sketch #2″]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/clauss_workshop_b1.jpg[/image]
[image title=”Smarter Cities of Tomorrow, Sketch #3″ alt=”Smarter Cities of Tomorrow, Sketch #3″]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/clauss_workshop_c1.jpg[/image]
[/fancy_images]

These images were made possible by the generous support of IBM and are also available on our Flickr set: Smarter Cities of Tomorrow.

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