Embedding Sustainability Solutions in a Master Planned Community

By Thomas D'Alesandro

Thomas D'Alesandro brings over 25 years of experience operating real estate companies - development and management organizations of up to 1,300 people - and has overseen the nation's largest mixed use master planned communities, including The Woodlands, TX, and Summerlin, NV. Mr. D'Alesandro's Blakefield, LLC has been advising clients globally on development strategy and execution since its founding in 2010.

Sep 11, 2013 | Smart Cities | 0 comments

The Research Triangle Region of North Carolina consistently sits at the top of “best place” lists – to live, grow a company or raise a family. Our reputation is an open secret, and the region is expected to add 40,000 new residents a year over the next twenty years. At the same time, the region’s renowned research park, RTP, is nearing full occupancy.

Chatham Park, a proposed master planned community totaling nearly 8,000 acres at the intersection of two major highways in Pittsboro, N.C., represents a future anchor to one of the nation’s fastest growing, economically vibrant and desirable areas.

Chatham Park is a new community designed to conserve significant open space, establish vibrant village and town centers, and attractively connect neighborhoods with businesses, entertainment, education and nature though an extensive trail system. It will be a place where the human and the natural connect in more rewarding ways — where you’ll be able to walk out your front door and experience the energy of Main Street or walk out your back door and feel the serenity of a quiet nature preserve. It builds on the traditions of other communities that successfully sought to create more environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable places.

Precedents include two communities I have had the privilege to develop: Reston, Virginia, the nation’s first planned community, which has been recognized as much for its extensive natural areas as for its vibrant town center, and The Woodlands, north of Houston, Texas, which was “designed with nature” to allow a robust city to rise within a thriving forest.

Chatham Park will be the best expression of smart growth values, incorporating long-range, regional considerations of sustainability: Open space preservation. Targeted goals to reduce natural resource consumption. Connected technology.

The Research Triangle Regional Partnership’s new Cleantech Cluster has become Chatham Park’s partner in a collaborative effort to commercialize the exciting innovations of over 200 companies engaged in clean technologies in the Research Triangle Region. This strategic alliance will permit Chatham Park to raise the bar on sustainability solutions within the community.

Chatham Park will be built from the ground up with digitized infrastructure that will allow for the monitoring and data processing needed to achieve large reductions in the use of water, electricity and carbon-based fuels.

This means that not only will Chatham Park be preserving forest and land as its precedent communities have done, but it will extend beyond their achievements to make visible to residents and businesses their ability to conserve a more comprehensive and significant range of natural resources. That Chatham Park will be fed by a vision of not doing piece-meal development – a Planned Development District will overlay the entire community – means systems-thinking is achievable. This may be Chatham Park’s most distinctive urban planning innovation.

With 1,000 acres set aside for accommodating businesses, Chatham Park will contain the largest new center for bringing employees together in North Carolina. The community will attract a range of jobs, as the region continues to draw expanding industries in the areas of technology, life sciences and medicine. The residents of Chatham Park will be able to live where they work, creating a greater work-life balance. When fully built out over the next thirty years, Chatham Park will have over 20,000 homes clustered in five villages.

While I am proud that Reston and The Woodlands demonstrated the ecological advantages of taking a holistic approach to community planning, of being in one place where you could live, work and play (not to mention the health advantages of living surrounded by natural beauty), they could not have been designed to deploy new technologies that address energy, water, or waste management challenges with an integrated information and communication systems-based approach. In this way, Chatham Park will be different. We call it a “future enabled community.” What this means is that Chatham Park will be a resilient community.

Chatham Park will provide demonstration and deployment projects that are crucial to bringing clean technology into widespread market readiness through scaled performance and cost assessment over a build-out period of several decades.

Chatham Park is a privately funded development and the clean technologies deployed there will be pragmatic. We are “blinders-off” to the reality that emerging technologies face a marketplace that is risk averse, requires high rates of return, is marked by incumbent technologies, and often has policy and program hurdles to overcome.

However, this project represents a significant opportunity to demonstrate emerging and enabling technologies, helping overcome barriers to their widespread adoption. The Chatham Park – Research Triangle Cleantech Cluster partnership will institute a holistic, phased approach that will showcase the commercial viability of clean technology today and into the future. As a greenfield, Chatham Park represents a significant opportunity to model savings from efficiency technologies and allow capital resources to be diverted to alternative applications.

Events like Meeting of the Minds shows the interest there is in putting the new powers we possess to use in making our cities and towns more efficient – and more livable. Endeavors like Chatham Park provide an especially promising venue for executing the new technologies, measuring them, and demonstrating their benefits to a world much in need of their positive results.

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Read more from the Meeting of the Minds Blog

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

The 7 Forces of Artificial Intelligence in Cities

The 7 Forces of Artificial Intelligence in Cities

AI has enormous potential to improve the lives of billions of people living in cities and facing a multitude of challenges. However, a blind focus on the technological issues is not sufficient. We are already starting to see a moderation of the technocentric view of algorithmic salvation in New York City, which is the first city in the world to appoint a chief algorithm officer.

There are 7 primary forces determining the success of AI, of which technology is just one. Cities must realize that AI is not the quick technological fix that vendors sell. Not everything will be improved by creating more algorithms and technical prowess. We need to develop a more holistic approach to implementing AI in cities in order to harness the immense potential. We need to create a way to consider each of the seven forces when cities plan for the use of AI.

I Am The River, The River is Me: Prioritizing Well-being Through Water Policy

I Am The River, The River is Me: Prioritizing Well-being Through Water Policy

In New Zealand, persistent, concentrated advocacy and legal cases advanced by Māori people are inspiring biocentric policies; that is, those which recognize that people and nature, including living and non-living elements, are part of an interconnected whole. Along the way, tribal leaders and advocates are successfully making the case that nature; whole systems of rivers, lakes, forests, mountains, and more, deserves legal standing to ensure its protection. An early legislative “win” granted personhood status to the Te Urewera forest in 2014, which codified into law these moving lines:

“Te Urewera is ancient and enduring, a fortress of nature, alive with history; its scenery is abundant with mystery, adventure, and remote beauty … Te Urewera has an identity in and of itself, inspiring people to commit to its care.”

The Te Urewera Act of 2014 did more than redefine how a forest would be managed, it pushed forward the practical expression of a new policy paradigm.

Made to Move Grants are Helping Cities Redesign for Active Transit

Made to Move Grants are Helping Cities Redesign for Active Transit

Can U.S. cities transform to overcome extreme car dependency?

In summer 2019, two values driven agencies came together to see if they could incentivize change in five cities with the Made to Move Grant program. This innovative, unique, and inspirational partnership between Degree and Blue Zones is awarding $100,000 dollars to each city to redesign their neighborhoods and city-centers for active, healthy lives. The program aims to create model practices and projects that gain the attention of other cities and inspire evolutionary changes to once again focus on places for people, and design accordingly.

Share This