Dear 2015: An Invitation to Participate in a Global Discussion on the Future of Cities

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Aug 3, 2015 | Announcements | 0 comments

Meeting of the Minds and Morris Strategy Group invite civic-minded leaders across sectors to participate in a group blogging event on October 6th. The event prompt is:

The year is 2050. Write a letter to the people of 2015 describing what your city is like, and give them advice on the next 35 years.

Participants are asked to write their response to the prompt and publish it on their website at exactly 9am, local time, on October 6th, 2015. Please include a link to the following URL in your response:

http://meetingoftheminds.org/cal/dear-2015

On the day of the event, a complete list of participants, with links to their responses, will be included at the above URL. To be included in the list of participants, email the link to your response to dear2015@cityminded.org, or share it via Twitter using the hashtag #dear2015.

Context

In the context of a rapidly urbanizing world, with two-thirds of the world’s population expected to live in cities by 2050, this event aims to explore the unique challenges and opportunities that the next 35 years will bring.

Some critical questions to consider:

  • How will we address our critical energy, infrastructure, food, water and transportation needs?
  • What technologies will emerge to help cities cope with climate change, pollution and density?
  • What will the 21st century urban core and suburbs look like, and how will they address and improve social equity?
  • In short, what will our cities look like in 2050?

Third Annual Group Blogging Event

Dear 2015 is the third group blogging event in what has become a annual, global conversation. Previous group blogging events discussed social equity, technology and economic opportunity in cities, and attracted dozens of writers from public, private, academic and philanthropic organizations. For a complete list of responses from previous group blogging events, see:

Publish on CityMinded.org

Don’t have a website? Publish your response on CityMinded.org. Visit our writing guidelines for more information.

About the Partners

Meeting of the Minds

Meeting of the Minds is an international knowledge sharing platform focused on the innovators and initiatives at the bleeding edge of urban sustainability and connected technology. Through our blog, magazine, webinars, monthly meetups, workshops, roundtables, and an annual summit held each fall, we invite international leaders from the public, private, non-profit, academic and philanthropic sectors to identify innovations that can be scaled, replicated and transferred from city-to-city and across sectors.

Meeting of the Minds is an initiative of Urban Age Institute, a 501(c)3 non-profit. Join 400+ other city-minded professionals at the annual Meeting of the Minds Summit, October 20-22, in Richmond and Berkeley, CA.

Morris Strategy Group

The Morris Strategy Group is a strategic consultancy that advises governments, businesses, and non-profit organizations in the United States and abroad on how to develop innovative tools to capture the social and economic benefits of our increasingly urbanized world.

Our team of professionals has a wide range of experience working in some of the highest levels of public service and the private sector to help our clients develop and implement the innovative solutions they need to achieve their goals.

More information at: morrisstrategygroup.com

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