Dear 2015: An Invitation to Participate in a Global Discussion on the Future of Cities

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Aug 3, 2015 | Announcements | 0 comments

Meeting of the Minds and Morris Strategy Group invite civic-minded leaders across sectors to participate in a group blogging event on October 6th. The event prompt is:

The year is 2050. Write a letter to the people of 2015 describing what your city is like, and give them advice on the next 35 years.

Participants are asked to write their response to the prompt and publish it on their website at exactly 9am, local time, on October 6th, 2015. Please include a link to the following URL in your response:

http://meetingoftheminds.org/cal/dear-2015

On the day of the event, a complete list of participants, with links to their responses, will be included at the above URL. To be included in the list of participants, email the link to your response to dear2015@cityminded.org, or share it via Twitter using the hashtag #dear2015.

Context

In the context of a rapidly urbanizing world, with two-thirds of the world’s population expected to live in cities by 2050, this event aims to explore the unique challenges and opportunities that the next 35 years will bring.

Some critical questions to consider:

  • How will we address our critical energy, infrastructure, food, water and transportation needs?
  • What technologies will emerge to help cities cope with climate change, pollution and density?
  • What will the 21st century urban core and suburbs look like, and how will they address and improve social equity?
  • In short, what will our cities look like in 2050?

Third Annual Group Blogging Event

Dear 2015 is the third group blogging event in what has become a annual, global conversation. Previous group blogging events discussed social equity, technology and economic opportunity in cities, and attracted dozens of writers from public, private, academic and philanthropic organizations. For a complete list of responses from previous group blogging events, see:

Publish on CityMinded.org

Don’t have a website? Publish your response on CityMinded.org. Visit our writing guidelines for more information.

About the Partners

Meeting of the Minds

Meeting of the Minds is an international knowledge sharing platform focused on the innovators and initiatives at the bleeding edge of urban sustainability and connected technology. Through our blog, magazine, webinars, monthly meetups, workshops, roundtables, and an annual summit held each fall, we invite international leaders from the public, private, non-profit, academic and philanthropic sectors to identify innovations that can be scaled, replicated and transferred from city-to-city and across sectors.

Meeting of the Minds is an initiative of Urban Age Institute, a 501(c)3 non-profit. Join 400+ other city-minded professionals at the annual Meeting of the Minds Summit, October 20-22, in Richmond and Berkeley, CA.

Morris Strategy Group

The Morris Strategy Group is a strategic consultancy that advises governments, businesses, and non-profit organizations in the United States and abroad on how to develop innovative tools to capture the social and economic benefits of our increasingly urbanized world.

Our team of professionals has a wide range of experience working in some of the highest levels of public service and the private sector to help our clients develop and implement the innovative solutions they need to achieve their goals.

More information at: morrisstrategygroup.com

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read more from MeetingoftheMinds.org

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

Smart Cities & Public Health Emergency Collaboration Framework

Smart Cities & Public Health Emergency Collaboration Framework

Based on our observations and experiences, we’ve written a white paper describing a Smart City-Public Health Emergency collaboration framework. We define a structured approach to broadly consider and maximize collaboration opportunities between the smart city innovation community and municipalities for the COVID-19 outbreak. It integrates the CDC Public Health Emergency and Response Capabilities standards with components of a smart city innovation ecosystem. The CDC defined capability standards are organized into six domains. Each intersection in the framework represents a collaboration point where the smart city’s innovation ecosystem and digital capabilities can be used to augment the municipalities’ public health emergency response needs.

COVID-19 is Creating the Largest Ever Telecommunity, But Not for Everyone

COVID-19 is Creating the Largest Ever Telecommunity, But Not for Everyone

Social distancing is becoming the new normal, at least for those of us who are heeding the Center for Disease Control’s warnings and guidelines. But if you don’t have reliable, high-speed broadband, it is impossible to engage in what is now the world’s largest telecommunity. As many schools and universities around the world (including those of my kids) are shut down, these institutions are optimistically converting to online and digital learning. However, with our current broadband layout, this movement will certainly leave many Americans behind.

How to Move More People with Fewer Vehicles

How to Move More People with Fewer Vehicles

Accenture analysts recently released a report calling for cities to take the lead in creating coordinated, “orchestrated” mobility ecosystems. Limiting shared services to routes that connect people with mass transit would be one way to deploy human-driven services now and to prepare for driverless service in the future. Services and schedules can be linked at the backend, and operators can, for example, automatically send more shared vehicles to a train station when the train has more passengers than usual, or tell the shared vehicles to wait for a train that is running late.

Managing urban congestion and mobility comes down to the matter of managing space. Cities are characterized by defined and restricted residential, commercial, and transportation spaces. Private autos are the most inefficient use of transportation space, and mass transit represents the most efficient use of transportation space. Getting more people out of private cars, and into shared feeder routes to and from mass transit modes is the most promising way to reduce auto traffic. Computer models show that it can be done, and we don’t need autonomous vehicles to realize the benefits of shared mobility.

Share This