Construction Begins on Kenyan Smart City

By Gordon Feller

Gordon Feller is the Co-Founder of Meeting of the Minds, a global thought leadership network and knowledge-sharing platform focused on the future of sustainable cities, innovation and technology.

Feb 4, 2013 | Smart Cities | 0 comments

The development of Konza Technology City – dubbed “Africa’s Silicon Savannah” – is finally underway, following a ground breaking ceremony by Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki on January 23, 2013.

Konza Technology City is a US$7-10.0 billion Greenfield project to be developed at a 5000 acre site at Konza, 60 kilometers south of Nairobi. This 20-year, four-phase development is a flagship project of Vision 2030, Kenya’s economic blueprint for attaining middle-income status by year 2030.

[map width=”300″ height=”310″ zoom=”6″]
[marker address=”konza, kenya”]Konza, Kenya[/marker]
[/map]

Konza will be a planned smart city, complete with ICT parks focused on what the founders are calling “IT-Enabled Services (ITES)”. By this they mean to include “Business Process Outsourcing (BPO), Software Development, Data Centers, Disaster Recovery Centers, and Call Centers”; light assembly manufacturing industries, residential, financial “and social amenities to provide a high quality of life”.

The first phase of development will take up 150 acres and lead to the construction of the “Business Pavilion”, which will host the Konza Master Plan Exhibition Hall and administrative offices.

Konza City will be managed by the Konza Technopolis Development Authority (KOTDA).

To enable the implementation of the Konza City project, the Kenyan Government contracted the services of HR&A Advisors of New York in July 2012 . HR&A is serving as a Master Delivery Partner for six months, with the goal being to come up with a business development strategy detailing the vision of the proposed technology city. HR&A is also creating an implementation plan which includes these elements: Anchor Tenant Strategy, Physical Master Plan, Infrastructure Financing Plan, Business and Cash-Flow Plan and a Governance Plan for KOTDA. HR&A are set to finalize their contractual mandate in a few days.

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

Please note that this comment section is for thoughtful, on-topic discussions. Admin approval is required for all comments. Your comment may be edited if it contains grammatical errors. Low effort, self-promotional, or impolite comments will be deleted.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Read more from the Meeting of the Minds Blog

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

The To-Do List for Cities 20 Years From Now

As Meeting of the Minds well knows, the integration of technology in all aspects of city life will manifest in many ways over the next two decades. Artificial intelligence, crowdsourcing, and data collection and analysis have gotten the most attention, but many of the most striking changes are set to occur in the physical realm – the layout of streets and sidewalks. Planners are hard at work right now trying to anticipate what’s going to be needed to accommodate delivery drones, trackless trams, and of course driverless cars and trucks, which will present their own congestion problems potentially, but also will free up all kinds of urban land no longer needed for traffic flow or parking. The transformation of the urban landscape will be more complicated than the transition from horses to cars, but no less doable.

4 Reasons Why Urban Landscapes are a Linchpin for Climate Resilience

Replacing grass with climate appropriate plants (and irrigating those plants properly) can reduce a landscape’s water needs by 70-80 percent. During the last California drought, we saw homes across the state doing this, a trend significant enough to be clear on Google Maps. This was a big part of why California’s urban communities were able to meet, in fact exceed, the emergency drought mandate of reducing water use by 20 percent.

How Cities Can Benefit from International Knowledge Exchange

The use platform provides information on how to develop and implement approaches in response to complex urban issues in a local context. Each of the case studies offers a summary of a project, program or policy, including challenges, lessons learned, impacts and an assessment of the transferability potential to another location. The use platform is free and accessible to everyone who shares an interest in urban sustainability.  Search our database, join the community, and upload your project.

Share This