CleanFleetReport.com Lists the Top 10 Car Sharing Programs

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Oct 13, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

CleanFleetReport.com recently published a list of the top 10 car sharing programs in America, with special attention paid to programs that feature the new electric vehicles from Nissan, Chevrolet, Ford, Toyota, Honda, Smart, BMW and other automakers.

They also make a special mention of their time at Meeting of the Minds 2012 in San Francisco and the connections they made there with Mark Norman, President of Zipcar, and Susan Shaheen, Co-Director, of Institute of Transportation Studies’ Transportation Sustainability Research Center.

From CleanFleetReport.com:

Mayors, urban planners, and technology experts exchanged ideas and success models at the latest Meeting of the Minds. This article was shaped by experts.

At the meeting, I lunched with Zipcar President Mark Norman gave me a good idea of why members prefer the range of carsharing services to owning a car. A member can try an electric car one day, use a larger van to transport 6 people the next, then take an AWD to the mountains on the next. Zipcar’s potential is enormous. By succeeding at a university such as USC in Los Angeles, Zipcar has a base to expand in Southern California’s over 10 million car drivers and massive fleets. I expect Zipcar to soon have over one million members.

Just as UPS has gone beyond delivery to offer large customers complex logistic services, Zipcar offers fleets a growing range of services. For example, the City of Houston better manages vehicle use by adding 50 existing city-owned fleet vehicles, including 25 Nissan LEAFs, with Zipcar’s FastFleet® proprietary fleet sharing technology. By using Zipcar’s FastFleet technology, the City of Houston configures its fleet footprint in real time for optimal utilization; manages preventive maintenance, fueling, billing, and fleet distribution; and uses Zipcar’s analytics with data automatically captured during every trip. Zipcar’s FastFleet technology is used in Washington DC, Boston, and Chicago where DC officials estimate that they save approximately $1 million per year using FastFleet technology.

I talked with Rick Hutchinson, CEO City CarShare, at Meeting of the Minds. As a non-profit, City CarShare actively works to make urban mobility more effective as people combine walking, bicycling, transit, and carsharing. For 11 years, they have modeled best practices, which others learn from including Zipcar, Enterprise, and independents. City CarShare promotes equity with CommunityShare and AccessMobile. They promote sustainability by taking cars off the road and adding electric vehicles.

Susan Shaheen, Co-Director of Transportation Sustainability Research Center (TSRC), has probably done more research about shared-use mobility than anyone. TSRC studies have determined that each carshare membership has resulted in at least 9 vehicles being sold, removed, or purchase-postponed. The biggest shift is one car households becoming car-free due to carsharing; 2 cars to one is another big segment. Her insights greatly helped with this article.

Read the full article here: 10 Best Car Sharing Programs in USA

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