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Smart City, Smart Procurement Strategy

Cities have primarily relied on traditional procurement methods because of the ability to effectively evaluate vendor requirements – and well, they’re familiar. However, this method is ill-adapted to the rapid innovation in smart cities technology, and can leave the city with outdated technologies, considering the inflexibility of some traditional procurement processes.

To overcome this challenge, some cities are incorporating new tools into their traditional processes to accommodate the changing vendor landscape.