[et_pb_cpt_author_bio admin_label="ET CPT Author Bio" author_name="on" author_name_link="author_url" author_name_target="none" author_bio="off" author_website="off" author_social="off" author_avatar="off" author_avatar_alignment="alignleft" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_css_main_element="text-align:center;" author_name_before="Articles by " text_font_size="30px" text_text_color="#ffffff" headings_text_color="#ffffff" /]
[et_pb_cpt_author_bio admin_label="ET CPT Author Bio" author_name="on" author_name_link="none" author_name_target="none" author_bio="on" author_website="off" author_social="off" author_avatar="off" author_avatar_alignment="alignleft" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" author_name_before="About " /]

Legal Liability Could Catalyze Action on Climate Change

Litigation has long been recognized as a tool for compelling change in individual behaviors and industry standards, often serving as a stopgap where existing government regulations are inadequate. For example, litigation against tobacco companies helped raise awareness about the health impacts from smoking and played a part in spurring stricter regulations on cigarette manufacturing and marketing.

In the climate change context, we’re seeing an evolution of different legal strategies being employed to affect changed behavior and standards.