Toyota Features Scion iQ-EV at Meeting of the Minds 2012

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Oct 18, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

The Scion iQ-EV, the smallest 4-passenger, 100% electric vehicle in the world, is designed to charge in 3 hours and cover a range of 62 miles. The car is considered the next frontier of urban mobility solutions, allowing drivers to park in miniscule spaces that were previously unavailable to them, as well as lower their carbon footprint in the process.

The Scion iQ-EV is not yet on the market but Toyota displayed the car for the first time to Meeting of the Minds attendees to gather their opinions. Only 100 iQ-EVs are available in the U.S., and we were happy to have Toyota display this one at Meeting of the Minds in San Francisco.

For an in depth analysis of the Scion iQ-EV, don’t miss the full review of the Scion iQ-EV by John Addison of CleanFleetReport.com.

Toyota also displayed the Th!nk, an older small electric vehicle to serve as a comparison with the iQ-EV. Spec sheets for both vehicles are available here: Scion spec sheet, Th!nk spec sheet.

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[image title=”Th!nk EV” alt=”Th!nk EV”]http://meetingoftheminds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8083766683_725a571098_b.jpeg[/image]
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