Smart Cities

What’s a ‘smart’ city? There’s no one definition. For many city leaders — and especially the private sector —  the term has become a shorthand for technology that makes cities work better or more efficiently.

 

Scroll down to see all of Meeting of the Minds blog posts, talks, and upcoming events related to smart and sustainable cities.

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Upcoming Events Related to Smart Cities

Cleveland Conversations: How Anchor Institutions Partner with Start-ups

September 26 in Cleveland, OH

A networking and thought leadership event designed to provoke a dynamic discussion about the future of the greater Cleveland-Akron-Columbus region and to pinpoint key strategies that will help catalyze the area’s innovation, mobility, and sustainability agendas.

Meeting of the Minds Annual Summit 2018

November 27-29 in Sacramento, CA

North America’s premier summit for urban sustainability, connected technology, and innovation. 400+ VIPs from public, private, non-profit, philanthropic and academic sectors convene.

Recent Blog Posts Related to Smart Cities

How to innovate in Smart Cities with AI

I envision a blended “future of work” that includes automation and augmentation — with the latter in the form of “decision support” tools that speed up and improve human performance, rather than compete with it. Computers are good at computing, surfacing potential decisions – and humans are good at context, or understanding the situational environment. When these two attributes are combined, it results in good judgement.

10 Objectives for Assessing Mobility as a Service (MaaS)

MaaS has a lot to offer to public transit and it’s time to take a closer look at those benefits. Contrary to a common misconception, integration of third-party transit services into the wider public mobility offering doesn’t hurt transit, it actually encourages wider use of public transit, maintaining and even actively increasing ridership. Alternative transit services can address first/last mile problems as well as serve routes that are typically very costly and require a high level of government subsidy (e.g. paratransit), not only increasing revenues for transit agencies but also helping to direct funding and investment back to core transit services.

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