Meeting of the Minds 2012 Final Report Now Available

By Jessie F. Hahn

Jessie F. Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Oct 30, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

Meeting of the Minds 2012 convened in San Francisco on October 9-11 with 344 attendees from 16 countries, 63 speakers, 27 sessions, almost 700 webcast viewers worldwide, and approximately 1,000 tweets. Download the final report here to get a full de-brief on Meeting of the Minds 2012 including:

  • Statistics
  • Written summaries of workshops
  • Video and photo links
  • Media and press coverage
  • Survey responses
  • Comments and suggestions
  • Full program
  • Attendee list

Download (PDF, 12.48MB)


Meeting of the Minds 2012 San Francisco Final Report

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