Meeting of the Minds Announces Two New Board Members

By Jessie F. Hahn

Jessie F. Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Nov 15, 2016 | Announcements | 0 comments

Meeting of the Minds is proud to announce two new Board Members: Scott Mauvais and John Jefferson.

Both have been long-time allies and supporters of Meeting of the Minds. They have repeatedly brought their expertise in urban and technology issues to our wider global thought leadership network through participation in our events, annual summit, brainstorming workshops, webinars, blog, and more.

John Jefferson is the Director of Statewide Constituency Relations at AT&T. He is responsible for the development and execution of strategy for coalition building and relationship management statewide. His focus is on building strong ties to influencers in segments ranging from rural and agriculture, to public safety and the environment as well as partnering with government, consumer, and business sales colleagues to create effortless customer service and accelerate sales opportunities.

Scott Mauvais is the Director of Technology and Civic Innovation at Microsoft’s San Francisco offices where he works with government and civic leaders, and the citizens they serve, to tackle urban challenges.

We greatly look forward to working with them further to strengthen the organization and identify new opportunities to deepen our impact.

Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Read more from the CityMinded.org Blog

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

Big Data, Automation, and the Future of Transportation

In recent years, a variety of forces (economic, environmental, and social) have quickly given rise to “shared mobility,” a collective of entrepreneurs and consumers leveraging technology to share transportation resources, save money, and generate capital. Bikesharing services, such as BCycle, and business-to-consumer carsharing services, such as Zipcar, have become part of a sociodemographic trend that has pushed shared mobility from the fringe to the mainstream. The role of shared mobility in the broader landscape of urban mobility has become a frequent topic of discussion. Shared transportation modes—such as bikesharing, carsharing, ridesharing, ridesourcing/transportation network companies (TNCs), and microtransit—are changing how people travel and are having a transformative effect on smart cities.

Smart Cities and the Weather

A study by the US National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in 2008 found that the impact of routine weather events on the US economy equates annually to about 3.4% of the country’s GDP (about $485 billion). This excludes the impact of extreme weather events that cause damage and disruption – after all, even “ordinary” weather affects supply of and demand for many items, and the propensity of businesses and consumers to buy them. NCAR found that mining and agriculture are particularly sensitive to weather influences, with utilities and retail not far behind.

Many of these, disaster management included, are the focus of smart city innovations. Not surprisingly, therefore, as they seek to improve and optimize these systems, smart cities are beginning to understand the connection between weather and many of their goals.  A number of vendors (for example, IBM, Schneider Electric, and others) now offer weather data-driven services focused specifically on smart city interests.

Meeting of the Minds is made possible by the generous support of these organizations.