Jones Lang Lasalle Releases New Study at Meeting of the Minds

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Oct 8, 2012 | Announcements | 0 comments

Jones Lang Lasalle has released a new study linking municipal investment in smart grid technologies and three key economic indicators. The release of the report comes at the beginning of Meeting of the Minds 2012 in San Francisco, where key stakeholders in the public, private and non-profit sectors will discuss the importance of smart city technologies.

From the report:

When Jones Lang LaSalle’s researchers compared “Connected City” smart grid cities with North American averages, they found that connected cities have an annual GDP growth rate that is 0.7 percent higher, an unemployment rate that is a full percentage point lower, and office occupancy rates 2.5 percent higher than less advanced cities.

Read the full release here: Jones Lang LaSalle’s “Connected City” Study Ties Cities’ Smart Grid Use to Economic Drivers for CRE Health

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