January 2015 Survey Results

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Jan 27, 2015 | Announcements | 0 comments

Here at Meeting of the Minds, we are always working to keep our finger on the pulse of the ever-changing and converging urban sustainability, innovation and technology space. In early January, we asked our global network of leaders to complete a short survey related to the biggest trends in 2014 and 2015 and which companies, organizations, cities, and individuals are underrepresented in both conferences and media. Below you will find the (anonymous) results.

We’re curious who the unsung heroes and emerging leaders are in this field. Those that are not getting the exposure and airtime they deserve. How are the traditional leaders being challenged by new players? Some of the answers were to be expected but some were altogether surprising and informative. It was a real testament to the diversity of knowledge, networks and the interdisciplinary nature of what we are all doing in our cities. Here at Meeting of the Minds, we’ve been looking into the organizations and leaders that you suggested. Perhaps they have a story to tell on CityMinded.org. If you or anyone you know is listed here, please get in touch with us and we’d be delighted to connect with them.

Download Survey Results (PDF)

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