Innovative Urban Technologies Showcased During Meeting of the Minds 2012

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Oct 17, 2012 | Announcements | 1 comment

Meeting of the Minds 2012 in San Francisco provided, for the first time, a showcase for Qualcomm and Cisco to collaborate on a new kind of digital public space. Both companies used the Leidesdorff Alley at the conference venue as a showcase for innovative urban technologies and demonstrations. Cisco’s next generation wi-fi was installed in the surrounding buildings to allow pedestrians in the alley to access the fastest wi-fi available on their smart phones. Qualcomm’s demo allowed users to swipe their hand across their smart phone to control their applications. Users were also able to share content from device to device, among other fun applications.

For more information, please find the presentations about the demonstrations here:

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1 Comment

  1. Wi-Fi will (eventually) be ubiquitous in urban areas and communities – it has to be. The current subscription-based Wi-Fi solution being rolled out by BT here in the UK (and in other countries) is the wrong business model, as customer take-up has been limited. the SF model would work well in Europe.
    Jay

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