How the Network is Changing Government

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Communications for Meeting of the Minds. He leads the organization's online and offline communications strategy.

Sep 17, 2012 | Urban Sustainability | 0 comments

Read Gordon Feller’s in-depth analysis of How the Network is Changing Government (link to PDF) in the recent issue of Public Sector Digest.

Feller, the Co-Founder of Meeting of the Minds and Director of Urban Innovation at Cisco, discusses the creation of smart and connected communities (SCC) in urban centers throughout the world. As he says,

As one critical infrastructure, information and communications networks, through the information they carry, are enabling the delivery of vital services, from transportation, utilities and security to entertainment, education, and healthcare. Everything is becoming connected, intelligent, and could, in the process, become greener: from office buildings and appliances to hospitals and schools. Citizens and businesses are starting to enjoy unprecedented levels of collaboration, productivity, and economic growth, all without compromising the environment. Managing and operating such a smart and connected community will not be easy, but it has the potential to make the city more efficient, better coordinated, and more secure.

Two vital facets of an SCC is that resources are being focused on facilitating efficient delivery and management of services. This means that effort is being expended to transform the “citizen experience” as they live, work, learn, and play. The methods vary from city to city, but the most successful efforts seem to be leveraging real-time information, analytics, and applications. With the network as the underlying platform, it is now possible for public and private partners to create and deliver services for home, work, school, hospitals, malls, stadiums, travel, and the government.

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