Final Report: A Global TelePresence Conversation on Smart Cities

By Dave Hahn

Dave Hahn is the Director of Digital Strategy for Meeting of the Minds.

Dec 21, 2013 | Announcements | 0 comments

Final Report: A Global TelePresence Conversation on Smart CitiesOn December 11th, 2013, Meeting of the Minds, in collaboration with the City of Amsterdam and Cisco Systems, organized a ninety-minute TelePresence conversation with urban sustainability leaders from Amsterdam, San Jose, Boston and Detroit to share best practices, challenges and opportunities related to smart cities. A live audience of 100+ participants joined the event in Amsterdam (as part of the coinciding Minds of Amsterdam conference) as well as 270+ webcast viewers.

The final report is available here. An archive recording of the event is available at this link.

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