Boulder’s DailyCamera.com Features Meeting of the Minds 2011

By Jessie F. Hahn

Jessie F. Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Sep 15, 2011 | Announcements | 0 comments

Boulder’s daily news website, DailyCamera.com, has included Meeting of the Minds 2011 in today’s edition. They included some nice words from the Mayor’s office and from Jennifer Judge, an MBA student at Colorado University.

[blockquote]”Certainly, events such as this, that focus on innovation, intelligence and creativity, are fabulous for Boulder,” said city spokeswoman Sarah Huntley.

The event will also allow a few lucky CU graduate students pursuing MBAs at the Leeds School of Business to volunteer at the event.

Jennifer Judge said her interest in sustainability prompted her response to an email requesting student volunteers for the summit. A first year student at Leeds, she plans to attend at least one of the 12 sessions scheduled during the summit.

“As a first year, I am really exploring my interest in terms of sustainability, so I hope that what I get out of it is refining where my interest could lie,” Judge said.[/blockquote]

Read more: [fancy_link link=”http://www.dailycamera.com/boulder-county-news/ci_18948240″]Boulder to host “Meeting of the Minds”[/fancy_link]

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Indianapolis Revitalizing Neighborhoods Through Arts & Culture

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When thinking about the cities of the future, I know that they will be more connected, and I strongly believe that they must be more inclusive. We can’t have the Internet of Everything without the Inclusion of Everyone. Already today, a growing number of cities are using smart technologies to better connect people to places and to each other – and more importantly also connecting people to opportunities for better and safer lives.

Unfortunately, what still causes a significant amount of friction in our cities and prevents inclusive growth is the dominance of cash. In fact, close to 85 percent of all consumer payments in the world are still done with cash or checks. This means that far too many people are trapped by default in an informal economy. They lack the financial services to guard themselves against risk, save for themselves, plan for their children’s futures, and build better lives.

Meeting of the Minds is made possible by the generous support of these organizations.