Boulder’s DailyCamera.com Features Meeting of the Minds 2011

By Jessie Feller Hahn

Jessie Feller Hahn is the Executive Director of Meeting of the Minds. She is an experienced urban planner, specializing in urban-regional policy with a particular focus on sustainability and clean energy. Previously, Jessie launched the successful Regional Energy Policy Program at Regional Plan Association in New York City. She has written numerous articles which have been featured in RPA’s Spotlight on the Region, The Hartford Courant, Urban Age Magazine, The Record, NPR, among others.

Sep 15, 2011 | Announcements | 0 comments

Boulder’s daily news website, DailyCamera.com, has included Meeting of the Minds 2011 in today’s edition. They included some nice words from the Mayor’s office and from Jennifer Judge, an MBA student at Colorado University.

[blockquote]”Certainly, events such as this, that focus on innovation, intelligence and creativity, are fabulous for Boulder,” said city spokeswoman Sarah Huntley.

The event will also allow a few lucky CU graduate students pursuing MBAs at the Leeds School of Business to volunteer at the event.

Jennifer Judge said her interest in sustainability prompted her response to an email requesting student volunteers for the summit. A first year student at Leeds, she plans to attend at least one of the 12 sessions scheduled during the summit.

“As a first year, I am really exploring my interest in terms of sustainability, so I hope that what I get out of it is refining where my interest could lie,” Judge said.[/blockquote]

Read more: [fancy_link link=”http://www.dailycamera.com/boulder-county-news/ci_18948240″]Boulder to host “Meeting of the Minds”[/fancy_link]

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