Boston Is Emerging as a Center for Mobility Innovation

By Gretchen Effgen

Gretchen Effgen is Vice President of Partnerships at nuTonomy and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Cities and Urbanization. She recently convened the Boston Mobility Roundtable.

Boston Is Emerging as a Center for Mobility Innovation

By Gretchen Effgen

Gretchen Effgen is Vice President of Partnerships at nuTonomy and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Cities and Urbanization. She recently convened the Boston Mobility Roundtable.

Boston Mobility Ecosystem

This is the fifth in a series entitled The Future of Mobility, a joint project of CommonWealth and Meeting of the Minds.

It goes without saying that mobility – the movement of people and goods – is an incredibly hot space. Start-ups are cropping up across the entire value chain as significant capital is deployed by incumbent strategic investors, mobility-specific funds like Fontinalis and BMW iVentures, as well as general tech funds looking to get in on the action. While headlines debate whether the nucleus of mobility innovation is Silicon Valley or Detroit, Boston’s entrepreneurial ecosystem has not only churned out an impressive array of start-ups but has also attracted established businesses seeking innovation and research talent. The included graphic primarily highlights the mobility-as-a-service (MaaS) players, representing a snapshot of the businesses that are solidifying Boston as a driving force in the mobility space generally.

The region’s strengths as a mobility player are arguably under the radar. Recently, Héctor Naves Sordo visited Boston to investigate the local scene on behalf of Swiss Re, a large re-insurance company that set up a local presence in 2016. Héctor shared his astonishment at the depth and breadth of the ecosystem, “I came to Boston to explore the AVs and IoT technology landscape and was blown away. We hear so much about Silicon Valley as a hub of innovation. It was energizing to discover an East Coast counterpart that is exploring the future of mobility, connected cars and AVs, topics that Swiss Re is monitoring closely as they will impact motor insurance and society in general.” Boston’s own insurance behemoth, Liberty Mutual, also has a group dedicated to future mobility and recently released an open API portal that combines public transportation data with proprietary insurance knowledge to power new products.

Local investors are engaging as well – some have been doing so for several years. Chris Cheever, who leads the Boston office of Fontinalis Partners, a mobility-focused venture capital firm says, “The talent pool here – both academic and entrepreneurial – provides fertile ground for the kind of innovation that is going to take mobility into the next generation and beyond. We recognized this early on, which is why we established our firm with both Boston and Detroit offices in 2009. We’re seeing more investors scouring Boston for mobility opportunities. Of our current portfolio of companies, approximately 25% are headquartered or originated in the Boston area, and as much as 50% have significant operational presence here. It really is a tremendous environment for mobility startups.”

The Boston Mobility Roundtable, an informal coalition of regional private sector companies, came together in late 2016 to support regional visibility and growth opportunities with respect to mobility. Recently, public sector officials from the MBTA, City of Boston, MassDOT and MassPort joined the Mobility Roundtable for an open discussion on the best ways to connect and collaborate. Kris Carter, Co-Chair of the City of Boston Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics said, “We are fortunate to have such a thriving innovation ecosystem in Boston, and we see our role as a champion for the sector and key collaborator in helping unlock new opportunities for the people of Boston. Whether that is providing consultation, test beds, or pilot program opportunities, it’s critical to work cooperatively in providing new mobility choices in an equitable way across the city.”

While transportation programs, infrastructure and norms are largely regional, transportation challenges are universal. Localizing innovative new mobility thinking or concepts for a city’s particular needs can create a ripple effect that expands our collective thinking. Already, mobility enthusiasts from Austin, Washington, DC, Silicon Valley and Detroit have been hand raisers to collaborate with Boston area efforts. Sharing solutions and learnings from programs conducted here (or carried out by Boston-based companies elsewhere) is just one way that Boston can continue to solidify its reputation as a center for mobility innovation.

On June 20, 2017, one hundred and twenty mobility leaders will convene in Cambridge, Massachusetts to discuss the future of mobility in the Boston region at the Boston Mobility Summit. This summit aims to harness the ingenuity and innovation already underway in the Commonwealth as well as the expertise of invited global thought leaders with best practices directly applicable to Boston’s challenges.

This day-long leadership summit will bring together C-suite executives from the private sector and public sector, non-profit leaders, entrepreneurs and academics to share local and global best practices applicable to the Boston region. The focus will be on transformative new technologies, policies, financing mechanisms, design and collaboration models with a particular focus on low-carbon and equitable solutions.

If you are interested in attending this invite-only summit, please fill out this application: http://cityminded.org/boston-application.

Discussion

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1 Comment

  1. It is interesting to note that IT is being used to bring about innovation in mobility. There is this fact that no one escape the competition for road space and parking space. There is nothing wrong in owning a car. The issue is the shortage of road space and parking space which leads to congestion and slowing down of traffic. The innovation can reduce the addiction to personally owned cars in a small way and give temporary relief to those using shared vehicles. For a long term plan which addresses the various mobility concerns arising out of the 21st Century commerce needs there is a demand for a New 21st Century Mobility Invention. All governments in all countries are focusing on expensive mass transit alternatives and none of these will help people to give up their cars. It is time for all the countries to get together and pool in their resources to develop a new mobility invention.

    Reply


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Discussion

Leave your comment below, or reply to others.

1 Comment

  1. It is interesting to note that IT is being used to bring about innovation in mobility. There is this fact that no one escape the competition for road space and parking space. There is nothing wrong in owning a car. The issue is the shortage of road space and parking space which leads to congestion and slowing down of traffic. The innovation can reduce the addiction to personally owned cars in a small way and give temporary relief to those using shared vehicles. For a long term plan which addresses the various mobility concerns arising out of the 21st Century commerce needs there is a demand for a New 21st Century Mobility Invention. All governments in all countries are focusing on expensive mass transit alternatives and none of these will help people to give up their cars. It is time for all the countries to get together and pool in their resources to develop a new mobility invention.

    Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Read more from the Meeting of the Minds Blog

Spotlighting innovations in urban sustainability and connected technology

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It is more than ironic that well into the 21st Century, the one great disruptive change in personal mobility is built upon the increased use of the internal combustion engine. Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) such as Uber and Lyft have become major players in the provision of personal mobility, primarily in urban areas. The problem with TNCs – and I say “problem” because it relates to what I perceive as their most negative impacts – is the essential auto-centric nature of the industry.

Electrify Everything and Slow Climate Change

In California, millions of homes are all-electric and 819,337 have solar roofs. Electric heat pumps can accommodate all needs for water heating, air conditioning and heating. Starting in 2020, all new California homes will be required to be zero-energy, accomplished by being well insulated, very efficient, all electric, and having solar roofs. Zero-energy homes, government and commercial buildings will allow the major cities of San Diego, San Francisco, and even massive Los Angeles to meet city goals of using 100 percent renewables.